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Forums» Electrical Codes» Commercial Kitchen GFCI

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Commercial Kitchen GFCI
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Re: Commercial Kitchen GFCI By  RC57

Posts: 0

9/22/2009 6:25:00 AM

Personally, I''ve never heard of a problem with GFI''s in a commercial kitchen. To me a compressor is a compressor. Whether used for refrigeration or an air gun on a job site through a temp power pole.


   

Re: Commercial Kitchen GFCI By  BPHolland

Posts: 0

9/22/2009 10:12:00 AM

In order for an appliance such as refrigeration equipment to be listed by a NRTL it must comply with the ground-fault leakage standard which is limited to well below the threshold of a Class A gfci device of 4-6 mA.

Unless you can positively determine the gfci is malfunctioning, the problem is with the appliance not the gfci.

The life safety aspect of gfci protection is much more important than possible nuisance (inconvenient) tripping of the device.


   

Re: Commercial Kitchen GFCI By  maniac

Posts: 0

9/22/2009 10:28:00 AM

The Manufacturers do not recommend the use of ground fault interrupter outlets (GFI) with their appliances, they actually recommend not using them.


   

Re: Commercial Kitchen GFCI By  brandon22

Posts: 0

9/22/2009 10:40:00 AM

`

Great topic... which begs the question. Do the kitchen appliances get connected to the GFCI rated circuits, via a plug in receptacle or hard wired to the junction box itself, or do they get connected to a "non-GFCI" rated circuit as some manufacturers require ?

Do the manufacturer'' installation instructions take priority over the NEC ?

`


   

Re: Commercial Kitchen GFCI By  BPHolland

Posts: 0

9/22/2009 10:41:00 AM

Not any more they don''t. As a matter of fact, manufacturer of cord-and-plug commercial kitchen equipment are required to identify in there instructions that connection to a gfci protected circuit is required.

Sometimes it takes a little time for the NRTL, NFPA, and manufacturer''s to get on the same page.

In the end, gfci protection IS required. If there is a concern that gfci tripping is going to be a problem, there are means such as installing temperature alarms that notify the users that the appliance is no longer cooling or operating.

It simply is not a good enough excuss to say I may loose some product to avoid having the gfci protection


   

Re: Commercial Kitchen GFCI By  inspector99

Posts: 0

9/22/2009 11:36:00 AM

Totally agree with you B.Holland. There is the option of trying a gfci breaker also. but i agree there is comething wrong with the appliance.


   

Re: Commercial Kitchen GFCI By  maniac

Posts: 0

9/22/2009 12:52:00 PM

"....manufacturer of cord-and-plug commercial kitchen equipment are required to identify in there instructions that connection to a gfci protected circuit is required..."
[b]Since when and under what code?[/b]


[b]Amana[/b] - Amana appliances require a properly grounded and polarized outlet. Amana does not recommend the use of ground fault interrupter outlets (GFI) with our appliances. The use of this type of outlet may not allow the appliance to operate properly. Some appliance components could create enough resistance to trip the GFI outlet during normal use.

If GFI outlets are required by your local electrical codes, the outlet should be rated at an amperage sufficient for the appliance installed on the electrical circuit containing the GFI.


[b]General Electric[/b] - We do not recommend GFI outlets with our appliances. GFCI or GFI (Ground fault circuit interrupt) GFI wall plugs check for any current or voltage that may "leak" to the ground. Most appliances have some current leakage to ground, especially electronic gas ranges. The spark igniter on a gas range will cause the GFCI to trip. It is recommended that you NOT plug an electric spark igniter gas range or ANY other major appliance into a GFI wall outlet. This includes: Refrigerators/Freezers, Microwaves/Advantiums, Dishwashers/Disposals, Electric Ranges/Wall Ovens, Gas Ranges (Electric Ignition), Washers, Dryers, Water Softeners, Filtration Systems with Electronic Monitors.



[b]Maytag[/b] - We do not have a recommendation for this type of outlet installation. If you have further questions or comments, please e-mail or contact our Customer Service Department. -



[b]Frigidaire ~ Electrolux - [/b]
We do not recommend the use of GFI outlets as they can go bad and cause loss of power to an appliance.


   

Re: Commercial Kitchen GFCI By  BPHolland

Posts: 0

9/23/2009 3:29:00 AM

"Since when and under what code?"

Under a modification of several ANSI/UL standards to coordinate with the changes to the NFPA 70. An Example would be ANSI/UL 471 and ASHRAE 15 - Commercial Refrigerators and Freezers.

In some cases, gfci protection is spelled out directly. In some cases, the language is vague or indirect such as:

[QUOTE]Equipment has been investigated with reference to risks to life and property [b]and for potential conformity to the installation and use provisions of the applicable installation codes and standards of the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA)[/b], and applicable model codes identified in the general Guide Information for each product category.[/QUOTE]


   

Re: Commercial Kitchen GFCI By  Uncle Bob

Posts: 0

9/23/2009 4:29:00 AM

Maniac has posted warnings from some major appliance manufacturers. Not following the manufacturers warnings may void the manufacturer''s warranty.

I''ve packed up most of my code books; however, the 2006 IRC, R102.4 states;

"Exception: Where enforcement of a code provision would violate the conditions of the listing of the equipment or appliance, the conditions of the listing and manufacturer''s instructions shall apply."

To enforce a code requirement that could or would cause failure of equipment and/or appliances; especially after being warned by the manufacturer; is inadvisable.

Uncle Bob


   

Re: Commercial Kitchen GFCI By  mtlogcabin

Posts: 0

9/23/2009 6:41:00 AM

Some are talking commercial kitchens some are referencing residential and is maniacs post related to commercial or residential appliances?
I am confused. Will some please clarify? :confused:


   

Re: Commercial Kitchen GFCI By  RC57

Posts: 0

9/23/2009 6:45:00 AM

The IRC doesn''t govern commercial kitchens. As far as the warnigs Maniac posted, I understand that recommendations aren''t mandatory I.E. shall & shall not. JMHO

Ron


   

Re: Commercial Kitchen GFCI By  Francis Vineyard

Posts: 0

9/23/2009 12:57:00 PM

I''ve heard first hand experiences of electrical shock and read an IAEI report of an electrocution from a freezer. But all information concerning appliances tripping GFCI has been hearsay to me.

north star, yes they''re hard wiring them to a non-GFI circuit with lock-outs.


   

Re: Commercial Kitchen GFCI By  maniac

Posts: 0

9/23/2009 5:35:00 PM

Below is a cut from one of many manufacturers that clearly state that their equipment will not work when connected to a GFCI.

ARCTIC AIR
COMMERCIALREFRIGERATOR/FREEZER
Receptacles with Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters (GFCI) are NOT RECOMMENDED.
http://www.managemyhome.com/mmh/lis_pdf/OWNM/L0805275.pdf


   

Re: Commercial Kitchen GFCI By  pyrguy

Posts: 0

9/23/2009 5:52:00 PM

[QUOTE]I''ve heard first hand experiences of electrical shock and read an IAEI report of an electrocution from a freezer. But all information concerning appliances tripping GFCI has been hearsay to me.[/QUOTE]Me too. I was about 6 my grandfather and uncle owned a bar. I went to get the coke I was promised and got knocked on my butt when I touched the SS cooler door.

It messed up my beer drinking for years after that. :D


   

Re: Commercial Kitchen GFCI By  Uncle Bob

Posts: 0

9/23/2009 6:39:00 PM

I was reading some of the possible problems and solutions, in that link; but, I didn''t see;

What do you do if the light doesn''t turn off when you close the door?

Uncle Bob


   

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