Alliance for National & Community Resilience Awards First Resilience Designation to Martinsville, Virginia

Washington, D.C. – The Alliance for National & Community Resilience (ANCR) issued its first community resilience designation to Martinsville, Virginia, at a meeting of the City Council held on July 27, 2021. Martinsville was selected as the initial pilot city for ANCR’s Community Resilience Benchmarks (CRB) for buildings and housing. The city was awarded an Essential designation for its building-related activities and an Enhanced designation for its housing-related initiatives.

“We were particularly impressed with the involvement of city staff and their transparency and thoroughness as we worked through the benchmarking process. Their commitment to the process will be invaluable in supporting improvements in the CRB process and help enhance the resilience of other communities,” said Evan Reis, ANCR Board Chair and Executive Director of the U.S. Resiliency Council.

The benchmarking process was led by Kris Bridges, Martinsville’s Building Official and Mark McCaskill, Martinsville’s Community Development Director. Jeremy Sigmon of Planet Sigmon served as the community’s ANCR Mentor, guiding them through the benchmarking process.

“The Martinsville City Council commends the work of our Inspections and Community Development Departments for their work with ANCR in improving the city’s resiliency and setting the standard for other communities to follow,” said Kathy Lawson, Mayor, Martinsville, Virginia. “The City of Martinsville is committed to the development of benchmarks such as the CRB as having the proper protocols in place will not only give us the needed information to maintain critical facilities and infrastructure during disaster events, but also allow us to reap the financial benefits, improve resiliency across our community and show our commitment to our community and citizens.”

Based on the feedback from Martinsville, ANCR will finalize its benchmarking process and begin work on developing additional benchmarks. The Buildings and Housing Benchmarks represent the first two benchmarks developed under the CRB. ANCR identified 19 community functions covering the social, organizational and infrastructural aspects of communities that influence their resilience and is developing benchmarks for each of them. The Water Benchmark was completed in 2020 and is currently being piloted along with the Buildings and Housing Benchmark in Oakland Park, Florida.

For more information on Martinsville’s achievement see www.resilientalliance.org/Martinsville. To learn more about the Community Resilience Benchmarks visit https://www.resilientalliance.org/the-benchmarks/.

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About the International Code Council
The International Code Council is the leading global source of model codes and standards and building safety solutions. Code Council codes, standards and solutions are used to ensure safe, affordable and sustainable communities and buildings worldwide.

About the Alliance for National & Community Resilience
The Alliance for National & Community Resilience, a member of the Code Council Family of Solutions, is a coalition of public and private entities working to create the nation’s first whole-community resilience benchmark system.

 

Act Now: Early-Bird Registration Open for International Code Council’s 2021 Annual Conference and Public Comment Hearings

Washington, D.C. – The early-bird registration deadline for the 2021 International Code Council’s Annual Conference and Public Comment Hearings in Pittsburgh, PA is open through Friday, August 6. Individuals can take advantage of the early bird discount by registering here.

The essential building safety conference will take place September 19 – 28 at the David L. Lawrence Convention Center and will feature expert speakers, networking opportunities with industry professionals from across the country and educational sessions.

This year’s event will focus on the long-lasting impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the building safety industry, with keynote speeches from Jennifer McClure, President, Unbridled Talent LLC, and Markus Achord, Head of Diversity, Inclusion and Belonging at Sunrun. McClure, an international speaker and business advisor, will explore progressive ways to evolve and disrupt traditional business practices, while Achord will explain the connection having a diverse and inclusive workforce has on innovation and success.

Educational workshops and resources will be available during the conference for participants to grow their knowledge and expertise within the building safety industry. Over the course of the conference, participants will have the opportunity to earn continuing education units (CEUs) at the following events:

  • Conference Education Program (Sunday, Sep. 19) – 3 hours or .3 CEUs
  • Building Tours (Sunday, Sep. 19 & Tuesday, Sep. 21) – Earn up to 12 hours or 1.2 CEUs
  • Annual Business Meeting (Monday, Sep. 20) – 2 hours or .2 CEUs

Additionally, attendees can earn CEUs at the Global Connections Day, the Public Comment Hearings and ICC Learn Live.

“While building safety is more important than ever, the expectations and challenges our industry is facing are rapidly evolving. Understanding this, our annual conference is poised to provide building safety professionals with the necessary tools and resources to adapt and succeed in this new landscape,” said Dominic Sims, CBO, Chief Executive Officer, International Code Council.

After the conclusion of the conference, the Public Comment Hearings will take place September 21—26. At this in-person only event, delegates and attendees will have the opportunity to influence and contribute to the 2024 I-Codes, the most widely used set of building codes and standards in the world. During these hearings, Governmental Member Voting Representatives will vote on all proposed code changes on behalf of their respective jurisdictions. While all testifying and voting activities will be done in-person only in Pittsburgh during the hearings, online voting will be made available shortly after. A live webcast of the hearings will be made available for viewing only. For more details about the code development process, view the hearing schedule and download these infographics: How It Works and By the Numbers.

Participants who register by Friday, August 6, receive an early-bird discount and a free polo shirt.

2021 Annual Conference major sponsors include 4Leaf, Inc., the American Concrete Institute, American Gas Association, iPlanTables.com and the Indiana/Kentucky/Ohio Regional Council of Carpenters.  Sponsorship opportunities are still available; download the 2021 Visibility Prospectus to learn more.

Visit www.iccsafe.org/conference for more information. Use the hashtag #ICCAC21 to join the online conversation.

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About the International Code Council
The International Code Council is the leading global source of model codes and standards and building safety solutions. Code Council codes, standards and solutions are used to ensure safe, affordable and sustainable communities and buildings worldwide.

International Code Council Welcomes Richard Anderson

Washington, D.C. – The International Code Council announced that Richard Anderson will be joining the organization as a Director of Plumbing, Mechanical, and Fuel Gas (PMG) Resources in the Government Relations Department. As part of his responsibilities, Anderson will work with the Code Council’s team of experts to develop, coordinate, and implement PMG programs and services related to the International Codes (I-Codes).

The building safety needs of communities are changing quickly, especially within the PMG space. Water is one of the most essential resources needed for human survival. As society continues to place a greater emphasis on the safety, affordability and resiliency of buildings, it is critical that those in the industry quickly adapt to meet these new priorities. Luckily, our building industry is aware of the long-lasting benefits it can bring to achieving the goal of water efficiency in both regional and global environments.

“Building codes and standards create an ecosystem of building policies that ensure the safety of our buildings and safeguard the health and wellbeing of building occupants,” said Dominic Sims, CBO, Chief Executive Officer, International Code Council. “As topics like water and energy efficiency become greater concerns for communities, we understand the importance of having a proven leader like Anderson join our team to provide his expertise and insights as a knowledgeable voice in this space.”

With 23 years of building safety and PMG experience, most recently Anderson represented the City of Fort Collins as a Chief Building Official where he oversaw the enforcement of all building codes for the city.

“Having long admired the Code Council’s work in building safety and having previously participated as a committee member for work group A IRC Plumbing and Mechanical, I am excited to join the organization,” said Anderson. “It is critical that the building safety industry both understands and adapts to the changing needs of society, and I cannot wait to lead the charge.”

Anderson will also oversee the Code Council’s new Conservation & Water Reuse Center, located in Colorado, which will provide resources for communities related to water efficiency and conservation.

For more information about the Code Council’s PMG program, click here.

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About the International Code Council
The International Code Council is the leading global source of model codes and standards and building safety solutions. Code Council codes, standards and solutions are used to ensure safe, affordable and sustainable communities and buildings worldwide.

International Code Council’s Senior Vice President of Government Relations, Sara Yerkes, to Retire

Washington, D.C. – Sara Yerkes, Senior Vice President of Government Relations at the International Code Council, is set to retire after spending the last 20 years as a leading voice for the local, state and federal adoption of the Code Council’s building codes and standards.

Yerkes began her career with the Code Council in 2001 and has supported the adoption and enforcement of the most up-to-date building codes since the first publication of the International Codes (I-Codes). Under her leadership, she has implemented and executed various proactive programs that have seen the I-Codes become adopted in all fifty states. Yerkes also co-founded and co-chairs the Coalition for Current Safety Codes, which consists of many safety and building code organizations with the mission of helping state and local jurisdictions modernize their construction codes.

“I want to thank the great team of leaders at the Code Council for their unwavering commitment to the safety and resiliency of our communities,” said Yerkes. “It has been my honor to serve alongside these leaders for the last 20 years and I look forward to continuing to support the Code Council’s mission as a consultant.”

Yerkes has cultivated relationships with both national and state organizations and has established beneficial alliances to support the Code Council’s mission. Throughout her tenure with the organization, Yerkes has also overseen the successful implementation of programs such as Building Safety Month, the Technical Training Program and the Military Families Career Path Program.

“We have been extremely fortunate to have someone with Sara’s expertise, passion and character help our organization accomplish its goals over the last two decades,” said Dominic Sims, CBO, Chief Executive Officer, International Code Council. “We would like to thank her for her exemplary service and dedication to safety and congratulate her on a well-deserved retirement.”

Upon retirement, Yerkes will transition to a consultant role and continue to provide her support and expertise to the Code Council. During this transition period, Deputy Senior Vice President Gabe Maser will take on additional duties before fully transitioning into leading the Government Relations Department as Senior Vice President upon her official retirement.

Over the past three years, Maser led the Code Council’s federal engagement and national strategic efforts. He also serves as the elected Chair of the High Performance Buildings Coalition. Before joining the Code Council, he served as a regional director for market expansion and policy at Renovate America; as the director of federal-state relations for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts; a legislative assistant for a member of Congress; and an associate at Baker Botts L.L.P. Maser has a bachelor’s degree in biology from McGill University and a juris doctorate from Georgetown University Law Center. He is a licensed lawyer in the District of Columbia and Massachusetts.

“Gabe has been a valuable addition to our team,” continued Sims. “He has spent the last three years advocating for building safety professionals at all levels of government, and we’re excited to have his experience and talent to support our members and customers in his new role.”

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About the International Code Council
The International Code Council is the leading global source of model codes and standards and building safety solutions. Code Council codes, standards and solutions are used to ensure safe, affordable and sustainable communities and buildings worldwide.

Launch of Code on a Mission Challenge

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Launch of Code on a Mission Challenge

This week, the International Code Council launched its “Code on a Mission” challenge which aims to have over one-third of the U.S. population covered by the 2021 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) by the end of 2023.

As you know, the 2021 IECC saw significant improvements over the 2018 edition. At the same time, with the zero-energy building goals set forth by the U.S. Administration for new construction by 2030 and 2050 for all buildings, heightened pressure is being placed on governments and elements of the building industry to address the need to reduce greenhouse gases (GHGs).

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has determined that that the residential provisions of the 2021 IECC provide a 9.4% improvement in energy use and an 8.7% improvement in carbon emissions over the 2018 IECC, saving homeowners an average of $2,320 over the life of a typical mortgage. Since 2006, the IECC has provided an approximately 40% improvement in energy efficiency, meaning that residents in states and cities on older IECC editions would see far greater savings. Energy codes continue to be an essential tool in achieving energy efficiency and GHG reduction goals and we are urging national, state and local governments to join the Code Council in this challenge.

We are challenging both the building industry and communities alike to update their building energy codes to meet or exceed the requirements of the 2021 IECC.

In support of the Code on a Mission challenge, the Code Council has developed a suite of resources:

We want to thank our members and stakeholders in advance for your support in helping us meet this goal and encourage all members to learn more about the campaign.

Supporting Organizations

 

International Code Council Launches “Code on a Mission” Challenge Urging Adoption of Modern Energy Efficiency Codes

Washington, D.C. – The International Code Council – the leading global source of model codes and standards and building safety solutions – launched its “Code on a Mission” challenge today which aims to have over a third of the U.S. population covered by the 2021 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) by the end of 2023. To make this a reality, the Code Council is challenging the building industry and communities alike to update their building energy codes to meet or exceed the requirements of the 2021 IECC. Already industry leaders like Architecture 2030, the Institute for Market Transformation (IMT), Energy Efficient Codes Coalition (EECC), Northeast Energy Efficiency Partnerships (NEEP), National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) and Responsible Energy Codes Alliance (RECA) have shown their support for the initiative.

As communities race to reduce their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and increase energy efficiency, modern and innovative energy codes are essential. Recognizing the increasing need for impactful tools and resources, the 2021 IECC incorporates significant improvements for both residential and commercial buildings over the 2018 edition including:

  • Increased insulation requirements and reduced fenestration U-factors and solar heat gain coefficients for both residential and commercial provisions.
  • New mechanical ventilation testing and exterior lighting requirements for residential buildings.
  • Lower ERI path values and additional energy reduction requirements in the residential requirements.
  • Updated mechanical equipment efficiency requirements, new provisions for data centers and plant growth lighting, and increased lighting efficacy and decreased lighting power density requirements for commercial buildings.
  • Zero energy appendices for jurisdictions wishing to implement zero energy building requirements today.

On July 21, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) released its final determination finding that the residential provisions of the 2021 IECC provide a 9.4% improvement in energy use and an 8.7% improvement in carbon emissions over the 2018 IECC, saving homeowners an average of $2,320 over the life of a typical mortgage. Since 2006, the IECC has provided an approximately 40% improvement in energy efficiency, meaning that residents in states and cities on older IECC editions would see far greater savings. The Department has also released data on energy, cost and GHG reductions each state and many cities could achieve by adopting the 2021 IECC, which are available here.

With the zero-energy building goals set forth by the U.S. Administration for new construction by 2030 and 2050 for all buildings, it is imperative that national, state and local governments incorporate energy codes to meet their GHG reduction objectives and align with these goals. Additionally, states and localities have set either GHG reduction goals or established zero-energy building targets that will require an alignment with modern energy codes.

Currently, per the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 14 states have adopted codes that are at least 20% less efficient than the current IECC while another ten states have no statewide energy code adopted.

“Reducing society’s GHG emissions is no longer a ‘nice-to-do’ but rather a critical necessity, and governments, communities and the building industry as a whole are increasingly recognizing the contributions of buildings,” said Ryan Colker, Vice President of Innovation at the International Code Council. “Luckily, modern and innovative model building codes like the IECC have already been developed to significantly curb emissions and help achieve zero-energy buildings. We urge national, state and local governments to accept our challenge and members of the building industry to support code updates.”

Please visit iccsafe.org/iecc-on-a-mission:

  • For more information on the “Code on a Mission” campaign.
  • To learn more about the benefits of the adoption and implementation of the 2021.
  • To report an adoption of a code that meets or exceeds the 2021 IECC.
  • To become a mission supporter or to access adoption resources.

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About the International Code Council
The International Code Council is the leading global source of model codes and standards and building safety solutions. Code Council codes, standards and solutions are used to ensure safe, affordable and sustainable communities and buildings worldwide.

Code Change Proposal Submittals Open for the 2024 International Energy Conservation Code and Chapter 11 International Residential Code

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Code Change Proposal Submittals Open for the 2024 International Energy Conservation Code and Chapter 11 International Residential Code

The International Code Council is currently accepting code change proposals for the development of its 2024 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) and Chapter 11 of the International Residential Code (IRC). As established through our recently released energy efficiency framework, Leading the Way to Energy Efficiency: A Path Forward on Energy and Sustainability to Confront a Changing Climate, the 2024 IECC will be updated using the Code Council's American National Standards Institute (ANSI) approved standards process.

As part of the 2024 development process, code change proposals will be asked to include an assessment of cost effectiveness in accordance with the intent statement of the IECC and shall consider any changes to the code as they impact the building owner, occupants and the energy system as a whole. Additionally, the Residential Energy Code Consensus Committee and Commercial Energy Code Consensus Committee shall adhere to the Code Council Board approved intents and scopes outlined in the framework.

Participation from various stakeholders in an equitable, accessible and responsive environment is key in developing a consensus standard that all of society will find impactful.

Therefore, we urge all interested parties from building safety professionals to government officials and concerned citizens to submit a code change proposal and engage in the development process.

Code change proposals will be accepted until 11:59 pm PT on October 12th. To submit a code change proposal, please visit the new energy only version of cdpACCESS:

Additionally, we are seeking public input on an electric vehicle (EV) charging resource, the first in a series of energy efficiency and greenhouse gas emission resources as outlined in the framework. Covering residential, commercial and multifamily applications, the resource provides communities flexibility in determining the best combination of EV-Installed, EV-Ready and EV-Capable spaces. Our staff draft is based on input from stakeholders, code change proposals considered for the 2021 IECC and policies already implemented in some jurisdictions. It also captures information on approaches states and localities have already taken to help support other jurisdictions considering use of the language and provides communities with model language coordinated with the I-Codes to help achieve additional GHG reductions.

Comments on the EV resource are due by 11:59 pm PT on August 16th.

For additional information on the Code Council’s energy initiatives, the framework and related FAQs, visit www.iccsafe.org/energy.

An Open Letter to Building Safety Professionals

We extend our condolences to all those affected by the recent Surfside, Florida, building collapse. And, we want to extend our deep appreciation to the first responders who were there in the immediate aftermath of the collapse and spent days searching for survivors. Our hearts and our gratitude are with you.

Building safety is a tough job. No matter your role – code official, architect, engineer, builder, tradesperson, or manufacturer – your job contributes to safe spaces for us to live and work. The work can be challenging and is often overlooked by the public. We want to take the time to say thank you all for the hard work you do.

When devastating incidents occur, our daily work is placed under a microscope. With the recent tragic collapse, the work you do may be under increased scrutiny. Your role as a building safety leader is more crucial than ever at this time as you guide the public, demonstrate integrity, and maintain professional competence. In your role, you ensure that tragedies like the Surfside condominium collapse are an extremely rare event.

The job of a building safety professional is hard, and often unnoticed and unappreciated, but it has a powerful impact on the world. Never forget that you are part of a community that is committed to creating safe, affordable, and sustainable buildings and communities. As always, we are here to support you; your fellow building safety professionals are here to support you as well. Even in the toughest of circumstances, we can work together to take lessons learned from tragic incidents like this and prepare for a more resilient future.

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Greg Wheeler, CBO
President
ICC Board of Directors

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Dominic Sims, CBO
Chief Executive Officer
International Code Council

Building Collapse in Surfside, Florida

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Building Collapse in Surfside, Florida

We are deeply saddened by the news of the building collapse in Surfside, Florida, last night. Our thoughts and prayers go out to those affected and to the rescue crews working hard to identify survivors.

As Florida officials continue to investigate this tragedy, the International Code Council will support Florida in any way it can. We understand this incident will likely spur additional inspections throughout the area, and the Code Council will share information with its network of code officials and inspectors should Florida need additional support.

The building that collapsed was built in the 1980s. Since Hurricane Andrew hit the state in 1992, Florida has adopted a rigorous code adoption and enforcement process. In fact, Florida has one of the strongest building codes in the U.S., which is based on the International Codes. As noted in the Insurance Institute for Business and Home Safety’s Rating the States 2021 report, Florida is ranked number one among the 18 states along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts for building code adoption, enforcement, and contractor licensing.

In times like this, we are reminded of the vital role building safety professionals play in making sure these incidents are rare while ensuring safe and sustainable communities. Together we will help Florida recover, and we will look to the lessons of the past to help us prepare for a better future.