IECC: 2024 and Beyond

Important News

News & Updates

IECC: 2024 and Beyond

In December 2020, the International Code Council Board of Directors put forward a framework for the updating of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) and Ch. 11 of the International Residential Code (IRC) using the ICC standards process, subject to stakeholder input and final approval by the ICC Board of Directors. Read more.

Public Comment Period

The Code Council Board will be meeting on Thursday, January 21, 2021, at 12:00 PM ET to hear verbal testimony from interested members and stakeholders. All comments received will be posted on the Code Council website.

Registration to participate has closed; the protocols for participation are available here. Click on “Written Comments” below to view the written submissions. You may still register to listen via YouTube to the January 21 virtual meeting here.

Related Resources

Please direct all questions to Mike Pfeiffer, Senior Vice President of Technical Services, at mpfeiffer@iccsafe.org.

Pandemic Taskforce

Board Task Force on Pandemics

Preparing Our Buildings & Communities for Disease-Related Threats

Many jurisdictions have already developed guidelines and policies in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. The International Code Council has been tracking these efforts and provides a compilation of resources for the building industry at www.iccsafe.org/coronavirus-response-center.

Due to the complex and non-uniform approaches implemented globally, it is imperative that all aspects of the built environment be thoroughly analyzed to develop a comprehensive response. Recognizing this critical threat to both new and existing construction, the Code Council and the National Environmental Health Association (NEHA) have established a new task force on pandemics to help our communities respond to COVID-19 and prepare for the next health threat.

Scope

The design and layout of buildings can have a significant impact on the health and safety of the occupants. This diverse task force will research the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on the built environment. The group will then develop a roadmap and propose needed resources – including guidelines, recommended practices, publications, and updates to the International Codes (I-Codes) – that are necessary to overcome the numerous challenges faced during pandemics to construct safe, sustainable and affordable structures. The Code Council anticipates that the task force will complete:

  • A comprehensive review of current code requirements as they relate to prevention of the transmission of diseases and other serious health concerns. Any suggested revisions to current code requirements based on this assessment will be processed as proposed code changes to the I-Codes.
  • A comprehensive review of existing guides, executive orders, white papers, reports and standards, as they relate to design standards, preparedness, health considerations and tools for operating during a pandemic.
  • Identification of best practices and guides to address the design and layout of new and existing buildings.
  • A comprehensive package of public information materials.

The new task force will include a broad cross section of experts from the building safety, construction, design, health and insurance industries.

The Code Council Board of Directors, in consultation with NEHA, will appoint the members of this task force.

Contact the task force liaison, Neil Burning at nburning@iccsafe.org if you are interested in joining the list of interested parties for communications about meetings and other updates.

IECC Benefits

Adopting the 2018 International Energy Conservation Code Can Save New Homeowners Hundreds of Dollars a Year

According to analysis by the Department of Energy (DOE) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), the average new home built to requirements in the 2018 IECC will save residents of most states hundreds or even thousands of dollars a year in energy bills over homes built to the currently adopted energy code.

On average, any increase in cost is recouped in the first year. When wrapped into a down payment and financing, the annual cost increase is dwarfed by the annual energy savings—indicating that following code requirements can play an important role in improving housing affordability.

The map below provides annual energy cost savings for the average new home along with other important data and an infographic that can be downloaded. Data for all states are available on the accompanying fact sheet. Data current as of October 2020.

IECC Benefits Map

Click your state to see how much you can save by adopting the 2018 IECC.

2018
2015
2012
2009
Other
IECC Benefits Placeholder
IECC Benefits
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Analysis assumptions:

  • Mortgage interest rate (fixed rate) 5% annual rate
  • Loan fees 0.7%, initial, % of mortgage amount
  • Loan term 30 years
  • Down payment 10%
  • Nominal Discount rate 5%
  • Inflation rate 2.52%
  • Marginal federal income tax 12%
  • Property tax 1.5%

Note: While a state may have adopted an energy code, it may not be applicable in all local jurisdictions. Consult codeadoptions.iccsafe.org for information on state and local adoptions.

International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) Adoptions

IECC Adoption

The International Code Council serves as the voice of the U.S. building safety and regulatory community in a variety of international dialogues related to safety and resilience in the built environment.

The Code Council’s commitment to energy conservation dates back to the 1970s when its legacy organizations first began developing model energy codes. The Model Energy Code (MEC) — the predecessor to the 1998 IECC — applied to all new residential and commercial buildings, and additions to such buildings.  

Each new edition of the energy code has provided for the cost-effective reduction of energy use.  

Energy codes are an essential component in a state or local government’s plans or commitments for renewable energy deployment, climate goals, housing affordability and public health. The U.S. Conference of Mayors stated, “building energy codes, by setting minimum efficiency requirements for all newly constructed and renovated residential, multi-family, and commercial buildings, provide measurable and permanent energy savings and carbon emissions reductions over the century-long life spans of these buildings;”

Communities that regularly adopt the IECC save money for residents and business and improve community health and resilience. Some jurisdictions routinely augment the most recent model code with additional energy-saving code provisions or programs 

States are required to review their residential energy code and update their commercial energy code within two years of a positive determination from the Department of Energy that a new edition of the IECC or ASHRAE Standard 90.1 saves energy. 

Across the U.S., the average new home built to the 2018 IECC can save homeowners thousands of dollars a year.

Adopting the 2018 International Energy Conservation Code Can Save New Homeowners Hundreds of Dollars a Year

According to analysis by the Department of Energy (DOE) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), the average new home built to requirements in the 2018 IECC will save residents of most states hundreds or even thousands of dollars a year in energy bills over homes built to the currently adopted energy code.

On average, any increase in cost is recouped in the first year. When wrapped into a down payment and financing, the annual cost increase is dwarfed by the annual energy savings—indicating that following code requirements can play an important role in improving housing affordability.

The map below provides annual energy cost savings for the average new home along with other important data and an infographic that can be downloaded. Data for all states are available on the accompanying fact sheet. Data current as of October 2020.

IECC Benefits Map

Click your state to see how much you can save by adopting the 2018 IECC.

2018
2015
2012
2009
Other
IECC Benefits Placeholder
IECC Benefits
X close

Analysis assumptions:

  • Mortgage interest rate (fixed rate) 5% annual rate
  • Loan fees 0.7%, initial, % of mortgage amount
  • Loan term 30 years
  • Down payment 10%
  • Nominal Discount rate 5%
  • Inflation rate 2.52%
  • Marginal federal income tax 12%
  • Property tax 1.5%

Note: While a state may have adopted an energy code, it may not be applicable in all local jurisdictions. Consult codeadoptions.iccsafe.org for information on state and local adoptions.

Hurricane Laura

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Hurricane Laura

On Thursday, August 27, Hurricane Laura made landfall in Louisiana as a high Category 4 hurricane bringing maximum sustained winds of 150 mph or more. Our thoughts are with all those who have been affected, particularly those building safety professionals in Louisiana and other affected states. With damage assessments from the storm just getting underway, much of what we will learn about impacts will emerge in the days to follow. As more information about the hurricane unfolds, we are here to help provide the support and resources you need to recover as quickly as possible.

The Code Council is keeping a close watch on developments. Ensuring safe and healthy homes and buildings as the foundation of community recovery is one of the most important jobs of building professionals. You play an integral role in preparing communities for natural disasters and in helping your communities get back on their feet after a devastating event. For those in the path of Laura, the Code Council and your fellow members from around the country stand ready to support you and your communities when needed.

Visit our hurricane safety and information webpage for resources that help people prepare for, and deal with, these devastating storms.

Click here to download the PDF of the Code Council's Hurricane Preparedness Guide.

If you are interested in adding your name to the Code Council's Disaster Response Alliance volunteer system to help communities after a major disaster, please register here. You can also find information on the DRA website to request assistance with post-disaster assessments if needed.

The Code Council encourages you to share this information directly with your chapters and local authority having jurisdiction as well as your professional networks.

Code Council Bylaws Committee Update

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Code Council Bylaws Committee Update

The International Code Council Bylaws serve as the primary governing document of the association. The Code Council Bylaws Committee was established to evaluate proposed bylaw amendments, provide input and propose additional related actions to the Code Council Board of Directors (See Council Policy 43-08.)

Recently, Code Council President Greg Wheeler appointed the committee that will conduct the first major review of the bylaws since their creation. The Code Council Board and Chief Executive Officer feel that a comprehensive look at the bylaws is important given the growth of the organization, the Code Council's 2025 strategic plan, and the changing world around us.

The following individuals have been appointed to serve on the committee:

Additionally, President Wheeler appointed the following three ex officio, non-voting members from the Emerging Leaders Membership Council to serve on the committee:

  • Elizabeth Arrington – Kentucky
  • Andre Jaen – Colorado
  • Benjamin Breadmore – Maine

President Wheeler has charged the Committee with evaluating potential amendments that would address natural or man-made emergencies or disasters, and with considering other potential revisions that the Committee determines to be prudent and in the best interests of the organization.

The next Bylaws Committee meeting is scheduled for September 1, 2020. The Committee will continue its work through a series of meetings throughout the fall and will develop a detailed report for the Code Council Board to consider in December 2020.

Member engagement will be critical to the Committee’s work. Please submit your feedback and comments related to the bylaws to memberinput@iccsafe.org.