HMEx Assistant™

HMEx Assistant

HMEx Assistant™ is the #1 best-selling software used by architects, design professionals, facility managers, and code officials to classify hazardous materials and manage chemical inventory for compliance with the Code Council’s International Fire Code and International Building Code. Use CAS numbers, RTECS numbers, or chemical names and synonyms to search for IFC/IBC hazard classes, and hazard ratings for NFPA 704 building signage. HMEx Assistant has been the industry standard since 1993.

Problem

Whether you’re the code official, building architect, or facility manager for a facility that handles hazardous materials, you need to know which chemicals are used, their hazard classifications, and if they’re over or under quantity limits that might require special treatment as a hazardous occupancy.

If you’re the fire or building official, you need the materials pre-classified by hazard class and summarized by control area, or you can’t approve the building plans or operating permits… resulting in project and possibly operating delays. Beyond that, you need a way to validate the hazard classes assigned and control area analysis submitted.

As the architect or facility manager, you have to compile the list of chemicals on-site and understand hazard classifications and control areas to comply with the fire and building code. Like you know how to do all that!

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Unfortunately…

Most architects and facility managers either have to learn the code requirements and how to classify the chemicals—or, they have to hire a pricy consultant.

And code officials, with limited time and resources, are hard pressed to validate hazard classes and control area analyses that drive the occupancy classification and the fire and life safe controls installed.

Every part of the process is a struggle without a detailed chemical database that includes the unique hazard classifications used by the fire and building code—and it’s seldom found on websites or in product safety data sheets.

If you’re lucky, you might find a database—only to discover it’s incomplete.

#1 Best-Selling Fire and Building Code compliance, chemical classification and inventory management tool available.

HMEx Assistant

#1 Best-Selling Fire and Building code-compliant chemical classification and inventory management.

HMEx is the ONLY system to combine an online chemical database with a chemical inventory management system to classify chemicals, create Hazardous Materials Inventory Statements (HMIS) and Summary Reports, and automatically evaluate compliance with IFC/IBC quantity limits.

HMEx is the ONLY system to combine an online chemical database with a chemical inventory management system to classify chemicals, create Hazardous Materials Inventory Statements (HMIS) and Summary Reports, and automatically evaluate compliance with IFC/IBC quantity limits.

International Code Council

FIVE REASONS TO CONSIDER HMEX

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1) One of the BEST chemical databases

Unlike manual research that can literally take hours if not days, or grossly incomplete existing databases, HMEx gives you access to critical fire and life safety data for thousands of chemicals in one place, allowing you to validate chemical information in minutes, not hours. Features include:

Physical and chemical properties

Displays boiling point, melting point, flash point, autoignition temperature, LD50, LC50, LFL, UFL, molecular weight, specific gravity/density, vapor density and vapor pressure. Having critical information you need to evaluate the potential hazards of a material consolidated in one place saves time.

Regulatory limits for Hazardous Materials

Provides threshold limits and reporting quantities for federal regulatory programs including, SARA, CERCLA, CAA, and OSHA PSM. Having a heads up whether any of these federal programs regulate a material helps you avoid potential fines and penalties for failing to comply.

DOT shipping information

Listed and correlated with 49 CFR Hazardous Materials Table 172.101. Easy access to up-to-date DOT shipping names and hazard class information can help keep you in compliance.

Firefighter hazardous materials warning placards

HMEx uses IFC Appendix F based on guidelines found in NFPA 704, Standard System for Identification of the Hazards of Materials for Emergency Response, to develop and display hazard ratings needed to alert emergency responders and comply with building signage requirements. This minimizes the need to look through individual safety data sheets, and it helps make certain the ratings are in the right place on NFPA 704 placards.

Screen chemical incompatibilities

Methodology developed by FEMA/DOT/EPA allows you to screen the consequences of the inadvertent mixing of two materials. This helps avoid catastrophes caused by mixing incompatibles and provides the peace of mind knowing that you did.

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2) Offers the BEST chemical classification for hazardous materials

Unlike most chemical databases that do NOT include fire and building code hazard classifications, a simple search in HMEx ensures materials are properly and consistently classified for code compliance.

IBC/IFC compatible classifications

Contains over 3,400 chemicals and 9,000 synonyms with hazard classifications correlated to the International Fire Code (IFC) and International Building Code (IBC). Saves you time and money and increases consistency across jurisdictions.

Identifies additional hazards for NFPA and OSHA

Identifies hazard classifications beyond the IFC and IBC, including irritant, sensitizer, carcinogen, radioactive, and other health hazards. Knowing more about a material’s health hazards assists you with the implementation of NFPA 704 and OSHA’s hazard communication system.

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3) BEST Chemical Inventory Management of Hazardous Materials

Most generic chemical inventory management software is not designed for chemical classification of hazardous materials for fire and building code compliance. In contrast, HMEx empowers you to classify, create and keep your inventory in compliance with the latest fire and building code in a fraction of the time, and have more accuracy.

In-house Inventory Management

Empowers you to manage, classify, create and update your own chemical inventories and generate summary reports with a single system – minimizing the need for costly consultants.

Auto-populates Inventory Statement

Automatically populates your inventory statement with fire and building code hazard classes and NFPA 704 hazard ratings for chemicals found in the database. Saves time and money, reduces mistakes.

Automatically Evaluates Inventory

Compares inventory quantities with limits set by the code, automatically applies the quantity increases and decreases allowed based on the fire protection controls and location, and notifies you if they’re over. Ensures accurate results, saves time, and reduces errors.

Data Exchange with External System

Import and export inventory data to and from external sources. Saves you time, minimizes manual data entry, and reduces errors.

Manage by Facility, Site, and Building

Simplifies managing inventories at complex sites. Users create and maintain inventories by company, site, facility, building, floor, and control area or H-occupancy. Ensures consistency, adds organization, reduces mistakes, and simplifies updating where inventories are maintained by multiple users. All of which encourage more frequent inventory updates and increases compliance.

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4) Absolute BEST reporting

Instead of spreadsheets that require complex formulas, extensive formatting and often still lack all the information needed for approval, HMEx automatically creates Inventory Statements and Summary Reports that demonstrate competence and compliance, making it a breeze for code officials to review and approve submittals.

Standardized Hazardous Materials Inventory Statements (HMIS)

Inventory Statements display essential information for each chemical, including the quantity confined to cabinets. Increases confidence that necessary variables have been considered and included in the allowable quantity calculations. This helps you get quicker plan approval from jurisdictions with HMIS that exceed requirements.

Hazard Class Summary Reports

Formatted to compare actual inventory quantities with maximum quantities allowed for each hazard class. Values that exceed allowable quantities or violate code requirements display red on the Summary Report, making it easy for you to confirm compliance and for code officials to review and approve.

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5) Strongest Industry Security

Extensive data security features include SOC 2 compliance, data encryption, firewall-secured operating system, infrastructure redundancy, multi-factor user authentication, data protection daily back-up, and ISO 27001 certification.

These features ensure your chemical inventory and facility data, as well as user and payment information, remain secure and accessible only to authorized users.

Plus, it is the price-performance leader!

HMEx includes the best features for the price in versions that best suit your needs whether you are a code official, designer, or facility manager. It saves countless frustrating hours calculating maximum allowable quantities and formatting building reports and potentially saving weeks of delays due to incorrect or incomplete classifications.

Get HMEx Assistant Today!

Testimonials

“We have clearly heard feedback from the building safety community asking us to strengthen the IECC and create new resources to help communities address their climate goals. We will rise to that challenge.”

Dominic Sims, CBO, Chief Executive Officer, International Code Council

 


“The American Society of Interior Designers has complete confidence in the ICC consensus based standards development process as a well-grounded framework that connects open and inclusive stakeholder participation with the balanced expertise necessary to address the complexities of building systems and technologies in the face of rapid advancement. ASID welcomes this procedural change in the IECC, along with its integration into Chapter 11 of the International Residential Code.”

Tracey Fillmore, NCIDQ, ASID, CAPS, Green AP, FL RID #6556
Chair, ASID Policy, Codes & Standards Committee

 


“The National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) and ICC have a long history of constructive collaboration to promote decarbonization, electrification, safety, and efficiency of buildings. NEMA Members make the technologies and systems necessary to achieve these aims, many of which are required or permitted in the family of I-Codes. We look forward to continued engagement in the IECC development process and will continue to be unwavering advocates for adoption and enforcement in every state and jurisdiction in the nation.”

Kevin J. Cosgriff, President and CEO, National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA)

 


“BOMA International applauds the International Code Council (ICC) for its effort to improve the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) development process though the combined efforts of a Residential Energy Code Consensus Committee and a Commercial Energy Code Consensus Committee. BOMA looks forward to continuing to work with ICC, utilizing the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) framework to update the IECC and to reach our shared goals of improved energy efficiency and greenhouse gas reduction.”

Don Davis, Esq., Vice President, Advocacy and Codes, BOMA International

 


“We look forward to working with the International Code Council and all stakeholders under this new process to move new buildings toward zero net energy and zero net carbon with the full suite of options, including solar.”

Solar Energy Industries Association

 


“Fortunately, there are some positive elements in the ICC’s adopted process that we can all work with. A quick review of their “Advancing Energy Efficiency” infographic looks promising for the IECC to support zero goals. They start with no rollbacks in efficiency. I think we can call that a win, and I think most states and municipalities would agree. Zero energy compliance pathways will also be required. The details are not yet known, but this looks promising for energy efficiency.”

Jim Meyers, Southwest Energy Efficiency Project

 


“The recent decision of the International Code Council (ICC) to pursue a consensus standard development process for future editions of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) provides the HERS industry a great opportunity to be engaged and participate in shaping future editions of the IECC. RESNET welcomes the opportunity to work with ICC and other participants to ensure future editions of the IECC are developed using a consensus-based process that is fair, open, transparent, and based upon science. RESNET also looks forward to suggesting members of the HERS industry to serve as volunteers on various committees that will be formed. Based on the solid foundation HERS Raters have in the building sciences and model energy codes, HERS Raters have much to contribute to ensuring the IECC continues to be the premiere model energy code internationally.”

Steve Baden, Executive Director, RESNET

 


“I am so thankful to see this happen!! As a member and strong supporter of organizations like ASTM, I really feel the path you have chosen is the correct one and will work amazingly well for ALL parties concerned.”

Robert De Vries, Director of Product Support & Development, Nu-Wool Co., Inc.

 


“As a code official and government employee, I’ve seen firsthand the importance of consensus in achieving lasting results. I am proud to support this new energy framework and development of the IECC through a standards development process. I know this plan will help all our communities get the resources they need to achieve their sustainability goals.”

Jim H. Brown, CBO, CFPS, Deputy Building Official for the City of Gillette, Wyoming;
Sectional Director, Code Council Board of Directors

 


“Every community is different. The resources that the International Code Council is developing under the new framework will help communities of all sizes in meeting their sustainability and efficiency requirements.”

Steven Shapiro, Deputy Director of Community Development, City of Hampton, Virginia;
Past President of the Code Council Board of Directors

 


“We are facing extreme weather and a changing climate. This new framework helps pave the way to a safer, more efficient, and more sustainable future.”

Michael L. Savage, Sr., MCP, CBO, CFPS, CEI-M,
Building Official, Marion County, Florida Department of Building Safety;
Director at Large, Code Council Board of Directors


“As we move forward in this new direction for the development of the ICC energy code, let us not forget that change is a good thing. We should embrace, adapt, and move forward in this new direction with professional integrity and respect for our members, stakeholders, and the citizens that we all serve.”

Ron Hampton, MCP, CBO,
Field Inspector II, Division of Building Code Enforcement,
Department of Housing, Buildings and Construction, Commonwealth of Kentucky;
Sectional Director, Code Council Board of Directors

 


“The Code Council has always been viewed as a leader in developing energy codes. The new energy framework, including the IRC, IECC and IGC, provides communities with much-needed guidance as they strive to meet their energy efficiency goals.”

Dwayne Garriss
Retired State Fire Marshal, State of Georgia

 

IECC – Leading the Way to Energy Efficiency

The International Code Council family of solutions is helping our communities forge a path forward on energy and sustainability to confront the impacts of a changing climate.

Code Change Proposal Submittals Open for the 2024 International Energy Conservation Code and Chapter 11 International Residential Code

The International Code Council is launching the Code on a Mission challenge to get over a third of the U.S. population covered by energy codes based on the 2021 IECC by the end of 2023.
Learn more about our campaign.

“We have clearly heard feedback from the building safety community asking us to strengthen the IECC and create new resources to help communities address their climate goals. We will rise to that challenge.”

Dominic Sims, CBO, Chief Executive Officer, International Code Council

“The American Society of Interior Designers has complete confidence in the ICC consensus based standards development process as a well-grounded framework that connects open and inclusive stakeholder participation with the balanced expertise necessary to address the complexities of building systems and technologies in the face of rapid advancement. ASID welcomes this procedural change in the IECC, along with its integration into Chapter 11 of the International Residential Code.”

Tracey Fillmore, NCIDQ, ASID, CAPS, Green AP, FL RID #6556
Chair, ASID Policy, Codes & Standards Committee

"The National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) and ICC have a long history of constructive collaboration to promote decarbonization, electrification, safety, and efficiency of buildings. NEMA Members make the technologies and systems necessary to achieve these aims, many of which are required or permitted in the family of I-Codes. We look forward to continued engagement in the IECC development process and will continue to be unwavering advocates for adoption and enforcement in every state and jurisdiction in the nation."

Kevin J. Cosgriff, President and CEO, National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA)

"BOMA International applauds the International Code Council (ICC) for its effort to improve the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) development process though the combined efforts of a Residential Energy Code Consensus Committee and a Commercial Energy Code Consensus Committee. BOMA looks forward to continuing to work with ICC, utilizing the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) framework to update the IECC and to reach our shared goals of  improved energy efficiency and greenhouse gas reduction."

Don Davis, Esq., Vice President, Advocacy and Codes, BOMA International

“We look forward to working with the International Code Council and all stakeholders under this new process to move new buildings toward zero net energy and zero net carbon with the full suite of options, including solar.”

Solar Energy Industries Association

“Fortunately, there are some positive elements in the ICC’s adopted process that we can all work with. A quick review of their “Advancing Energy Efficiency” infographic looks promising for the IECC to support zero goals. They start with no rollbacks in efficiency. I think we can call that a win, and I think most states and municipalities would agree. Zero energy compliance pathways will also be required. The details are not yet known, but this looks promising for energy efficiency.”

Jim Meyers, Southwest Energy Efficiency Project

“The recent decision of the International Code Council (ICC) to pursue a consensus standard development process for future editions of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) provides the HERS industry a great opportunity to be engaged and participate in shaping future editions of the IECC. RESNET welcomes the opportunity to work with ICC and other participants to ensure future editions of the IECC are developed using a consensus-based process that is fair, open, transparent, and based upon science. RESNET also looks forward to suggesting members of the HERS industry to serve as volunteers on various committees that will be formed. Based on the solid foundation HERS Raters have in the building sciences and model energy codes, HERS Raters have much to contribute to ensuring the IECC continues to be the premiere model energy code internationally.”

Steve Baden, Executive Director, RESNET

“I’m so very thankful to see this happen!! As a member and strong supporter of organizations like ASTM, I really feel the path you have chosen is the correct one and will work amazingly well for ALL parties concerned.”

Robert De Vries, Director of Product Support & Development, Nu-Wool Co., Inc.

“As a code official and government employee, I’ve seen firsthand the importance of consensus in achieving lasting results. I am proud to support this new energy framework and development of the IECC through a standards development process. I know this plan will help all our communities get the resources they need to achieve their sustainability goals.”

Jim H. Brown, CBO, CFPS, Deputy Building Official for the City of Gillette, Wyoming;
Sectional Director, Code Council Board of Directors

For over three decades, the Code Council has developed an energy code that has reduced the impact of energy use on our planet and saved consumers billions of dollars on their energy bills. From 2006 to 2021, the IECC increased its efficiency requirements by about 40%, or an average of 8% a cycle.

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The Code Council is building on the technical solutions provided by the International Energy Conservation Code, International Residential Code, and International Green Construction Code to address communities’ energy efficiency and greenhouse gas reduction goals. These solutions include:

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A new scope and intent for the IECC that integrates pathways to reach zero energy buildings presently and by 2030, additional energy efficiency and greenhouse gas reduction options, and increased energy savings each edition.

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Development of energy efficiency and greenhouse gas reduction resources to address additional community goals including electric vehicle charging, electrification, integration of renewable energy and energy storage, embodied carbon, and performance standards for existing buildings.

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An Energy and Carbon Advisory Council of governmental and built environment leaders to advise on which additional greenhouse gas reduction policies the IECC should integrate, the pace that the IECC’s baseline efficiency requirements should advance, and needs and gaps that the Code Council should work to address.

Other Resilience and Climate Resources and Activities