Code Change Proposal Submittals Open for the 2024 International Energy Conservation Code and Chapter 11 International Residential Code

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Code Change Proposal Submittals Open for the 2024 International Energy Conservation Code and Chapter 11 International Residential Code

The International Code Council is currently accepting code change proposals for the development of its 2024 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) and Chapter 11 of the International Residential Code (IRC). As established through our recently released energy efficiency framework, Leading the Way to Energy Efficiency: A Path Forward on Energy and Sustainability to Confront a Changing Climate, the 2024 IECC will be updated using the Code Council's American National Standards Institute (ANSI) approved standards process.

As part of the 2024 development process, code change proposals will be asked to include an assessment of cost effectiveness in accordance with the intent statement of the IECC and shall consider any changes to the code as they impact the building owner, occupants and the energy system as a whole. Additionally, the Residential Energy Code Consensus Committee and Commercial Energy Code Consensus Committee shall adhere to the Code Council Board approved intents and scopes outlined in the framework.

Participation from various stakeholders in an equitable, accessible and responsive environment is key in developing a consensus standard that all of society will find impactful.

Therefore, we urge all interested parties from building safety professionals to government officials and concerned citizens to submit a code change proposal and engage in the development process.

Code change proposals will be accepted until 11:59 pm PT on October 12th. To submit a code change proposal, please visit the new energy only version of cdpACCESS:

Additionally, we are seeking public input on an electric vehicle (EV) charging resource, the first in a series of energy efficiency and greenhouse gas emission resources as outlined in the framework. Covering residential, commercial and multifamily applications, the resource provides communities flexibility in determining the best combination of EV-Installed, EV-Ready and EV-Capable spaces. Our staff draft is based on input from stakeholders, code change proposals considered for the 2021 IECC and policies already implemented in some jurisdictions. It also captures information on approaches states and localities have already taken to help support other jurisdictions considering use of the language and provides communities with model language coordinated with the I-Codes to help achieve additional GHG reductions.

Comments on the EV resource are due by 11:59 pm PT on August 16th.

For additional information on the Code Council’s energy initiatives, the framework and related FAQs, visit www.iccsafe.org/energy.

Code Change Proposal Submittals Open for the 2024 International Energy Conservation Code and Chapter 11 International Residential Code

Washington, D.C. –The International Code Council, the developer of the most widely used and highly regarded set of building safety codes and standards in the world, is currently accepting code change proposals for the development of its 2024 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) and Chapter 11 of the International Residential Code (IRC). As established through the Code Council’s recently released energy efficiency framework, Leading the Way to Energy Efficiency: A Path Forward on Energy and Sustainability to Confront a Changing Climate, the 2024 IECC and Chapter 11 of the IRC will be updated using the Code Council’s American National Standards Institute (ANSI) approved standards process.

The 2024 edition will continue to build on the success of the prior editions allowing the IECC to remain a strong avenue for communities to reach their energy efficiency and sustainability goals globally. As part of the 2024 development process, code change proposals will be asked to include an assessment of cost effectiveness in accordance with the intent statement of the IECC and shall consider any changes to the code as they impact the building owner, occupants and the energy system as a whole. Additionally, the Residential Energy Code Consensus Committee and a Commercial Energy Code Consensus Committee shall adhere to the Code Council Board approved intents and scopes outlined in the framework.

“The IECC in conjunction with the Code Council’s recently released framework are invaluable resources for communities to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions and achieve their energy efficiency goals,” said Dominic Sims, CBO, Chief Executive Officer of the Code Council. “Understanding this, the Code Council is committed to providing the necessary processes and forums to enable the continued development and maintenance of these tools and resources such as the IECC.”

Additionally, the Code Council is seeking public input on an electrical vehicle (EV) charging resource, the first in a series of energy efficiency and greenhouse gas emission resources as outlined in the Code Council’s framework. Covering residential, commercial and multifamily applications, the resource provides communities flexibility in determining the best combination of EV-Installed, EV-Ready and EV-Capable spaces. The Code Council staff draft is based on input from stakeholders, code change proposals considered for the 2021 IECC and policies already implemented in some jurisdictions. It also captures information on approaches states and localities have already taken to help support other jurisdictions considering use of the language and provides communities with model language coordinated with the International Codes (I-Codes) to help achieve additional GHG reductions. Comments on the EV resource are due August 16th. Access the draft and instructions for commenting: here.

Modern building codes require input from professionals throughout the building pipeline to be effective. Participation from various stakeholders in an equitable, accessible and responsive environment is key in developing a consensus standard that all of society will find impactful. The Code Council urges all interested parties from building safety professionals to government officials and concerned citizens to submit a code change proposal and engage in the development process.

Code change proposals will be accepted until 11:59 pm PT on October 12th. To submit a code change proposal, please visit the new energy only version of cdpACCESS here. For additional information on the Code Council’s energy initiatives, the framework and related FAQs, visit www.iccsafe.org/energy

About the International Code Council
The International Code Council is the leading global source of model codes and standards and building safety solutions. Code Council codes, standards and solutions are used to ensure safe, affordable and sustainable communities and buildings worldwide.

International Code Council Raises Awareness Around Wildfire Safety with Three New Fire Prevention Resources

Washington, D.C. – As the pace of wildfire season increases throughout the United States, the International Code Council, the developer of the most widely used and highly regarded set of building safety codes and standards in the world, is emphasizing the importance of fire safety through its three newly released fire prevention titles: 2021 IWUIC® Code and Commentary, Significant Changes to the International Fire Code, 2021 Edition, and the 2019 California Fire Code Amendments Handbook.

This is critical as the Congressional Research Service, citing Wildland Fire Summary and Statistics from the National Interagency Coordination Center (updated May 2021), reports that since 1960 the three largest wildfires in total acreage burned have occurred in the last five years. The report also notes people are increasingly finding themselves within or moving to wildland urban interface (WUI) zones. The WUI is defined by the U.S. Fire Administration as areas where human-made structures and infrastructure are in or adjacent to areas prone to wildfires.

The Code Council’s three new publications each address a critical component of wildfire and fire safety and prevention:

  • 2021 IWUIC® Code and Commentary provides a convenient reference for regulations in the 2021 International Wildland-Urban Interface Code (IWUIC), which focuses on the use of ignition-resistant building materials including specially designed vents to prevent embers from penetrating into eaves and under foundations, creating and maintaining defensible space, and fire service access to structures and water supplies.
  • Significant Changes to the International Fire Code, 2021 Edition: a comprehensive analysis of the significant changes in the new edition of the International Fire Code (IFC), offering key insights into the implications of these changes.
  • 2019 California Fire Code Amendments Handbook is a new resource that was developed, in partnership with the California Fire Prevention Officers and the California Fire Chiefs Association, to help users understand the purpose and intent of the California amendments to the state-adopted fire code, including an extensive, legislative history of the California Office of the State Fire Marshal, and to provide a greater degree of standardization in code application throughout the Golden State.

“The troubling trend of more frequent and destructive wildfires, coupled with moderate to extreme drought in several states, has put a spotlight on the need for innovative and comprehensive building codes and standards that address wildfire prevention and building safety,” said Dominic Sims, CBO, Chief Executive Officer of the Code Council. “It is important that the building safety community continues to seek ways to improve our codes and standards, while imploring local and state governments to adopt these advanced codes to keep their communities protected.”

The federal government requires its construction and FEMA-assisted reconstruction in the wildland-urban interface to adhere to the IWUIC, and according to the National Institute of Building Sciences, retrofitting 2.5 million homes in the WUI to the 2018 edition of the IWUIC could provide a nationwide benefit-cost ratio as high as $8 to $1.

With the duration of wildfire season extending across the U.S. and the consequences becoming more severe, communities must work to adopt and implement the most up-to-date building codes to help prevent wildfires. For quick tips and additional resources on wildfires, please visit the Code Council’s Wildfire Information and Resource Page.

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About the International Code Council
The International Code Council is the leading global source of model codes and standards and building safety solutions. Code Council codes, standards and solutions are used to ensure safe, affordable and sustainable communities and buildings worldwide.

An Open Letter to Building Safety Professionals

We extend our condolences to all those affected by the recent Surfside, Florida, building collapse. And, we want to extend our deep appreciation to the first responders who were there in the immediate aftermath of the collapse and spent days searching for survivors. Our hearts and our gratitude are with you.

Building safety is a tough job. No matter your role – code official, architect, engineer, builder, tradesperson, or manufacturer – your job contributes to safe spaces for us to live and work. The work can be challenging and is often overlooked by the public. We want to take the time to say thank you all for the hard work you do.

When devastating incidents occur, our daily work is placed under a microscope. With the recent tragic collapse, the work you do may be under increased scrutiny. Your role as a building safety leader is more crucial than ever at this time as you guide the public, demonstrate integrity, and maintain professional competence. In your role, you ensure that tragedies like the Surfside condominium collapse are an extremely rare event.

The job of a building safety professional is hard, and often unnoticed and unappreciated, but it has a powerful impact on the world. Never forget that you are part of a community that is committed to creating safe, affordable, and sustainable buildings and communities. As always, we are here to support you; your fellow building safety professionals are here to support you as well. Even in the toughest of circumstances, we can work together to take lessons learned from tragic incidents like this and prepare for a more resilient future.

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Greg Wheeler, CBO
President
ICC Board of Directors

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Dominic Sims, CBO
Chief Executive Officer
International Code Council

California Launches RESNET Water Efficiency Rating Program, HERSH2O®, Developed in Partnership with the International Code Council

Washington, D.C. – The California Energy Commission’s accredited rating providers, CalCERTS and CHEERS, were recently approved by RESNET as official HERSH2O providers – paving the way for the launch of the water efficiency rating program in California.

Built off RESNET’s nationally recognized Home Energy Rating System (HERS®) Index, which is the gold standard for rating the energy efficiency of a home, HERSH2O was developed as a system for rating whole-house water efficiency including both indoor and outdoor uses through a consensus development process with input from more than 75 organizations.

“The approval of CalCERTS and CHEERS as official HERSH2O providers brings us one step closer to increasing water efficiency in the state of California,” said Mark Johnson, Executive Vice President, International Code Council. “Due to an ongoing strain on water resources in the state, there is no better time to introduce this water efficiency ratings program that will not only help consumers lower their bills, but also conserve resources.”

The approval of two of California’s accredited rating providers comes as water resources are becoming increasingly strained in many parts of the country and the cost to upgrade aging water infrastructure is taking a toll. With water prices increasing faster than energy prices, there is the potential for water efficiency measures to impact cost savings throughout the US.

“Water is society’s most precious commodity, and we need to ensure we are utilizing it efficiently,” said Steve Baden, Executive Director, RESNET. “As the water crisis becomes more critical, we are proud to be working with the International Code Council to not only be addressing this issue but provide a solution that will benefit California homeowners immensely.”

With the average family spending more than $1,000 annually on water costs, HERSH2O provides a simple, easy to compare rating on a scale from 0-100+; where lower numbers mean less water use. By using this scale, it makes it easier to cross check efficiency between homes, allowing homeowners to gauge their own home’s effectiveness. The HERSH2O Index was developed as part of a partnership between RESNET, the International Code Council, Natural Resource Defense Council and the EPA WaterSense Program. The basis for HERSH2O is ANSI/RESNET/ICC Standard 850.

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About the International Code Council
The International Code Council is the leading global source of model codes and standards and building safety solutions. Code Council codes, standards and solutions are used to ensure safe, affordable and sustainable communities and buildings worldwide.

About RESNET

The Residential Energy Services Network (RESNET) is a not-for-profit, membership corporation that is governed by a board of directors (who are elected by membership). RESNET is a recognized national standards-making body for building energy efficiency rating and certification systems in the United States.

International Code Council Celebrates Updates to Texas’ Statute for Building and Residential Codes

Washington, D.C. – On June 7, Governor Greg Abbott signed Texas House Bill 738 (HB 738), which amends sections of Texas’ Local Government Code and establishes the 2012 International Building Code (IBC) and International Residential Code (IRC) as the statewide municipal statutory codes for commercial, multi-family and residential construction in Texas. The IBC and IRC are part of the International Code Council’s family of building safety codes, the International Codes (I-Codes) – the most widely accepted, comprehensive set of model codes used in the United States. Prior to HB 738, Texas had the oldest State Statutory IRC (2000) and IBC (2003) on the books to date in the U.S.

“On behalf of the International Code Council, I was honored to work collaboratively with Representative Dennis Paul of Houston, the Texas General Land Office and a coalition of Texas stakeholders including the Building Officials Association of Texas (BOAT) to successfully advocate for the Lone Star State to update its statutory IRC and IBC codes. The Code Council commends Governor Greg Abbott for signing HB 738 into law and Texas for taking a proactive approach to adopting more modern codes across all municipalities,” said Kelly Sadler, Government Relations Senior Regional Manager for Texas, International Code Council. “This is an important step in the right direction for Texas to promote resilience and to mitigate disasters. We look forward to Texas taking many more steps to safeguard the safety of its citizens in the future.” 

Adopting and enforcing the most up-to-date building codes not only reflects a jurisdiction’s commitment to the health and safety of its citizens but helps to preserve building resilience and durability in the face of increasingly severe weather events. As a minimum safeguard, building codes establish a building’s safety and energy performance for years to come.

“BOAT is dedicated to enhancing the standards of uniformity and efficiency in administering and enforcing model building codes,” said Jeffrey Widmer, CBO, Building Official, City of Rockwall, Texas, BOAT President. “Promoting adoption of the ICC codes is consistent with our mission. We were pleased to offer our assistance to the International Code Council in their effort to successfully update the statutory codes in our great state of Texas.”

As the intensity and frequency of natural hazards like hurricanes continue to increase, HB 738 follows the recommendations of two significant Texas Hurricane Harvey Reports – Eye of the Storm: Report of the Governor’s Commission to Rebuild Texas and Hurricane Harvey: Texas at Risk. According to a recent FEMA study, if all future construction adhered to up-to-date I-Codes, the U.S. would avoid more than $600 billion in cumulative losses from floods, hurricanes, and earthquakes by 2060. Additionally, the National Institute of Building Sciences estimates that adopting modern editions of the I-Codes saves $11 for every $1 invested through mitigation benefits against those hazards.

“In Texas, 78% of the municipalities have a population of less than 10,000 and in a majority of those, adoption of the latest editions of codes is not a priority. However, properly constructed homes and businesses provide life and fire safety to the occupants. In addition to providing this safety, the adoption and enforcement of current building codes are a major factor in a city’s Insurance Services Office (ISO) rating,” said Shirley Ellis, CBO, ICC Board of Directors, Building Official, City of Bastrop, Texas. “As a building official in a Texas city of less than 10,000, I am privileged to have a city council who understands the importance of the adoption and enforcement of current codes. Now that HB 738 is passed, I believe we will increase and improve the consistent updating of codes across the state.”

Model building codes are the foundation of a community and form an ecosystem of building policies that support the health, safety and welfare of the neighborhoods that adopt them. As the safeguard for our homes, schools, entertainment centers, workplaces, and every type of building in between, the adoption of both the IBC and IRC by Texas will create a uniformity that ensures maximum efficiency, resilience and safety for its citizens.

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About the International Code Council
The International Code Council is the leading global source of model codes and standards and building safety solutions. Code Council codes, standards and solutions are used to ensure safe, affordable and sustainable communities and buildings worldwide.

International Code Council and North American Deck and Railing Association release important Deck Safety publication

Washington, D.C. – The International Code Council and the North American Deck and Railing Association have released the second edition of Deck Construction: Based on the 2021 International Residential Code, which is the most comprehensive publication available for deck code compliance. The publication contains provisions for decks from the 2021 International Residential Code (IRC), as well as tables and figures, commentary, photos and illustrations that help readers better understand the intent and purpose behind the code provisions. Distinctions between the 2018 and 2021 IRC provisions were also included where relevant.

“As we enter the warmer months and families and friends look to spend more time outside, the integrity of deck construction will be essential to maintaining safety throughout the summer,” said Code Council Executive Vice President Mark Johnson. “Decks are niche construction projects, as such, everyone involved in these projects will benefit learning from this comprehensive and streamlined learning tool focused exclusively on decks.”

“May is Deck Safety Month®, however, deck safety is a 365-day issue,” said Michael Beaudry, Executive Vice President of NADRA. “As codes and construction capabilities are updated, the need to work closely with the association is paramount to ensuring that everyone involved in deck construction and maintenance adhere to the codes put forth by ICC.”

This publication also enables building authorities to easily access more specific information about decks and how their prescriptive designs and mandatory minimum requirements can be different from other structures.

The Deck Construction publication, by Glenn Matthewson, is available for purchase on the Code Council store, here.

About the International Code Council
The International Code Council is the leading global source of model codes and standards and building safety solutions. Code Council codes, standards and solutions are used to ensure safe, affordable and sustainable communities and buildings worldwide.

About the North American Deck and Railing Association
The mission of the North American Deck and Railing Association (NADRA) is to provide a unified source for the professional development, promotion, growth, and sustenance of the Deck and Railing building industry in North America so that members can exceed the expectations of

Building Collapse in Surfside, Florida

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Building Collapse in Surfside, Florida

We are deeply saddened by the news of the building collapse in Surfside, Florida, last night. Our thoughts and prayers go out to those affected and to the rescue crews working hard to identify survivors.

As Florida officials continue to investigate this tragedy, the International Code Council will support Florida in any way it can. We understand this incident will likely spur additional inspections throughout the area, and the Code Council will share information with its network of code officials and inspectors should Florida need additional support.

The building that collapsed was built in the 1980s. Since Hurricane Andrew hit the state in 1992, Florida has adopted a rigorous code adoption and enforcement process. In fact, Florida has one of the strongest building codes in the U.S., which is based on the International Codes. As noted in the Insurance Institute for Business and Home Safety’s Rating the States 2021 report, Florida is ranked number one among the 18 states along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts for building code adoption, enforcement, and contractor licensing.

In times like this, we are reminded of the vital role building safety professionals play in making sure these incidents are rare while ensuring safe and sustainable communities. Together we will help Florida recover, and we will look to the lessons of the past to help us prepare for a better future.

TēCA Raises the Bar for Cannabis-Related Trainers and Course Developers with IAS Accreditation

Brea, California – The ēLearn Cannabis Academy (TēCA), a division of the ēLearn Academy, is the first cannabis-related training and curriculum development organization to be accredited through the International Accreditation Service (IAS) Training Provider and Training Course Developers (AC371) program.

TēCA’s mission is to provide the cannabis and cannabidiol (CBD) industries with a “Gold Standard” learning experience through IAS-accredited courses that are available 24/7/365 online. The TēCA certificate credential, earned by trainees after passing an online proctored exam, will recognize and validate an individual’s qualifications to work in the cannabis and CBD industries and enhance their legitimacy and professionalism.

When asked about the importance of accreditation, Robert Cochrane, Chief Learning Architect for the ēLearn Academy said, “Legitimate accreditation is the future of the industry. Training, education and credentialing are vital to providing greater professionalism, consistency and standardization in the cannabis and CBD industries. Our goal is to prepare knowledgeable cannabis dispensary technicians (CDT) by providing the most comprehensive and detailed employee training program available anywhere. To accomplish this goal, we need to ensure that TēCA credentialed customers are qualified, and our curricula meets, and even exceeds, regulatory and recognized standards.”

The IAS Accreditation Criteria for Training Providers and Training Course Developers (AC371) requires training agencies to demonstrate competence, both in the way of qualified trainers and curriculums. The comprehensive accreditation process requires an evaluation of the training agency’s corporate structure, facilities, staffing, curriculum, program development and administration. The IAS approach aims to ensure that accredited training programs prepare trainees to be efficient and competent to meet the needs of industry, regulators and consumers. It strengthens the professional and academic reputation of training programs.

Dr. George Anastasopoulos, IAS Vice President of Global Development & Compliance welcomed TēCA’s AC371 accreditation as the first of its kind that solely focuses on the training and curriculum development for the cannabis sector, setting an international benchmark and a best-practice model.

“The TēCA certificate will enhance the professional recognition of a person’s qualifications to work in the cannabis and CBD industries,” he added.

About TēCA

As a division of the ēLearn Academy, The ēLearn Cannabis Academy (TēCA) provides an accredited, 24/7/365 online training program for professionals in the cannabis and CBD industries.  Upon passing an online proctored exam, trainees are awarded a certificate of completion which will recognize and validate their qualifications to work in the cannabis and CBD industries and enhance their legitimacy and professionalism. 

About IAS

The International Accreditation Service (IAS) is a nonprofit accreditation body based in Brea, California USA. Providing accreditation services since 1975, IAS is one of the leading accreditation bodies in the United States and a signatory to several international mutual recognition arrangements (MRAs). IAS is part of the International Code Council Family of Solutions. The Code Council offers a leading personnel certification program that recognizes an individual’s qualifications in the code enforcement profession of the construction industry. For more information, visit iasonline.org.

The International Code Council launches process to conduct an in-depth review of the ICC Performance Code

Washington, D.C. – The International Code Council announced today that it will be working with Brian Meacham, PhD, PE, an international expert in performance-based building control systems, to launch a process of reimagining the ICC Performance Code for Buildings and Facilities (ICCPC). The aim is to gain a better understanding of current thinking and perspectives across multiple disciplines about how performance-based approaches are viewed in the United States and internationally, and to learn from the past two decades of increasing use of performance-based codes.

When the ICCPC was developed in the late 1990s, the key areas of focus in the discussion surrounding performance-based design were structural and fire and life safety. Since that time, knowledge has advanced in many areas, such as indoor air quality, renewable energy and energy storage systems, and on the performance of building materials and systems. The current ICCPC also does not include explicit consideration of sustainability and resiliency concepts, which have become important components of building regulation. A more contemporary ICCPC could address these items and more, and it would also be better positioned to address matters of resiliency related to increasingly severe weather-related events. Like the original effort which led to development of the ICCPC, the current reconsideration of the code should consider the current state of practice in performance-based design, what advancements have been made in the U.S. and internationally, what is needed for broad acceptance and implementation, who the key players are, and what is needed to achieve the objectives.

“Performance-based design has both advanced and grown in use over the past few decades, and many standards development organizations in the United States have embraced performance-based design in their area of focus,” said Code Council CEO Dominic Sims, CBO. “And while performance criteria and methods have been incorporated into the International Building Code (IBC), the time seems right to explore the potential opportunities as well as concerns that can support the development process of a modernized ICCPC.” 

The Code Council has launched a new ICCPC portal, which includes the opportunity for stakeholders around the world to register their interest in collaborating to rethink the ICC Performance Code, and to join an active discussion through a new Code Council-moderated discussion forum on LinkedIn. The Code Council will also be using surveys and roundtable discussions to solicit input and engagement to determine how to best proceed to create a more updated, comprehensive, and robust performance code that will be more attractive for adoption by a wide range of jurisdictions around the world.

About the International Code Council
The International Code Council is the leading global source of model codes and standards and building safety solutions. Code Council codes, standards and solutions are used to ensure safe, affordable and sustainable communities and buildings worldwide.