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Drying in Before Installing Wiring
January 2, 2018
3:16 pm
trinityelec43@gmail.com
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Print Post Post #1

No one quoted the NEC... Article 334.12 (B) 4... Sounds like a case of  "Get er done"... Reading is fundamental

November 30, 2017
4:11 am
pradeepk.miracle@gmail.com
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Print Post Post #2

Thanks for sharing valuable information.

August 29, 2009
7:31 am
pierre belarge
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Print Post Post #3

There are also local jurisdictions that do not permit the installation of wiring until the roof is on and the windows/siding is tight. We have a number of them here in our county (44 jurisdictions), about 35 of them require it to be so.

August 28, 2009
5:14 pm
paul hardy
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Print Post Post #4

I will bet that every inspector out there has inspected and approved nm cable that hs been exposed to rain riding in the bed of an electricians truck.

August 25, 2009
2:40 pm
peach!!
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Print Post Post #5

looks like he''s looking for a "dry" location to run his wiring.. and I would bet that some building departments require it when romex is used.

August 25, 2009
7:55 am
raider1
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Print Post Post #6

So what permanent damage is caused when NM cable is subject to rain during construction?

I agree that equipment should be protected from permanent damage that could occur during building construction, but that does not mean that all dry location rated equipment and wiring methods are permanently damaged from exposure to rain water.

Chris

August 24, 2009
4:30 pm
wwebb
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Print Post Post #7

The article that may be the root of this thread could be 110.11 (2008 NEC), second paragraph:

"Equipment not identified for outdoor use and equipment identified only for indoor use, such as "dry locations,""indoor use only,""damp locations," or enclosure Types 1, 2, 5, 12, 12K, and/or 13, shall be protected against permanent damage from the weather during building construction."

Now, I could see someone reading this as having to have the building ''dried-in'' prior to allowing wiring methods that are not approved for wet locations to be installed. In fact, I believe that this was the intent of the new language (no matter WHAT a study said about rmex in flooded homes.

JMHO

August 24, 2009
8:48 am
raider1
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[QUOTE]but the electrical code does exclude wire other than approved for installation in "wet locations" from wet locations.

so if you''re sure its not going to rain Romex your little heart away and go to church daily
[/QUOTE]Again the definition of location, dry makes it very clear that a dry location (interior of a building) may be temporarily wet such as a building under construction. Here is the definition.

[QUOTE]Location, Dry. A location not normally subject to dampness or wetness.[b] A location classified as dry may be temporarily subject to dampness or wetness, as in the case of a building under construction.[/b][/QUOTE]NM cable can be rained on without damage to the cable. In fact the only thing you need to worry about is if the cut ends of the cable are immersed in water. [URL=http://www.ul.com/global/eng/pages/offerings/perspectives/regulator/electrical/additionalresources/flooding/nmb/]HERE[/URL] is a link to an article written by UL in regards to flood damaged NM cable.

Chris

August 21, 2009
6:56 pm
architect1281
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Print Post Post #9

nothing requires a dry work area for electrial wiring to proceed.

but the electrical code does exclude wire other than approved for installation in "wet locations" from wet locations.

so if you''re sure its not going to rain Romex your little heart away and go to church daily

August 21, 2009
12:48 pm
grayheadedmule
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Print Post Post #10

I have actually have heard that too. Now I wouldn''t go as far as making the builder have all the siding on, but when they say dried in, I take it as at least having the felt paper on it!

August 21, 2009
5:36 am
mark karmann
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Print Post Post #11

As stated in the posts before me. There''s nothing in the NEC that would require this. Contractor is trying to buy some time.

August 17, 2009
12:49 pm
david yount
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Print Post Post #12

Raider<<<<<<<<<<< banged that one on the head. Location dry/temp dampness etc.

POP

August 17, 2009
12:45 pm
raider1
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Print Post Post #13

There is nothing in the NEC that would require a building to be completely dried in before installing the premise wiring system.

In fact within the definition of Location, dry in Article 100 it mentions that a location classified as dry may be temporarily subjected to dampness or wetness, as in the case of a building under construction.

Chris

August 17, 2009
12:30 pm
inspector99
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Print Post Post #14

not that i''m aware of. I was an electrician for 18 yrs and don''t remember that one. I beleive you are right. The electrician is behind. We require that the house be dried in enough to stop any "weather" damage to the wiring

August 17, 2009
12:16 pm
glenn roy denman
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Larry,

It sounds to me like an excuse for why he was late to do the job. Are you saying it''s not in there?

August 17, 2009
12:13 pm
inspector99
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Print Post Post #16

Ask the electrician where it says this in the NEC.