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Door swing into public sidewalk
November 7, 2017
3:26 pm
fgrable@iccsafe.org
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Print Post Post #1

Thanks Marty! We all learned something, especially ME. I hope it helps others.

November 6, 2017
10:52 am
marty.simon@kroger.com
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Regarding if this applies to a sidewalk on private property, the 2012 [and 2015 : MODERATOR] IBC Commentary for Section 3201.1 Scope states:

These provisions apply only to encroachments on the
public right-of-way, not on interior lot lines. The extent
and location of the street lot line (public right-of-way)
is determined through a variety of methods based on
the regulations of the local jurisdictions and often the
state. The location and width of streets is often established
when an area is platted and the land is subdivided
into a series of blocks, lots and streets. While
subdivision and zoning laws may provide for standard
street and right-of-way width, many areas of a jurisdiction
may predate those standards. Streets and
highways are often established by state and local
government transportation agencies. Such agencies
can create new streets or widen existing streets by
either purchasing or condemning land of sufficient
width. In other circumstances, public streets are not
owned by a city, but they are easements across privately
owned lands. Because of the wide variety of
ways in which a public right-of-way can be established,
it is important for the building official to know
how rights-of-way were established within the jurisdiction
and to be able to provide this information to
permit applicants.

November 6, 2017
9:34 am
gsmidt@lemarsiowa.com
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Bam, that's it.  IBC 3202.2 will cover it.  Thanks for all of the help.  I just could not find what I was looking for.  Again, thanks. 

November 3, 2017
4:08 pm
fgrable@iccsafe.org
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Sure enough, you have hit upon something that I didn't know about.  Thanks.

One term that I am not sure about is "public right of way". I understand the intent (for not having someone walking to run into a door that just opens in front of them.) The question is where is this applicable? 

The original poster said "opening onto a public walkway." I guess that is enough to apply to his situation and write a violation.

But I wonder about other arrangements where a single building sits on a large privately owned property, 100s of feet away from any public right of way. Does this section still apply for the sidewalk placed directly in front of that building? 

EDITED BY POSTER: The Code has a definition for Public Way. I dug the following up from some work being done by the Access board: 

Public Right-of-Way. Public land or property, usually in interconnected corridors, that is acquired for or devoted to transportation purposes.

It seems to be that ownership by the public is necessary before this limitation kicks in...but I am just grabbing here.

November 3, 2017
7:44 am
marty.simon@kroger.com
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Refer to the last sentence in Section 3202.2: "Doors and windows shall not open . . ."

November 1, 2017
5:40 pm
fgrable@iccsafe.org
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I did a brief run through of Chapter 10 (Egress) and I didn't see anything about that. When I think about what I see in the real world, there are many doors that (are required to) open out to the public way and do so from the flat front of a building or tenant space. Where the front of the building adjacent to the door is opaque, it certainly makes it more difficult for the person exiting to see if anybody is moving along the sidewalk, close to the front of the building. Even worse when the door is also opaque. 

EDITED BY POSTER:  In my opinion, most people don't walk that close to the front of buildings just for that reason. But, when it is crowded and people are exiting in a hurry, collisions could result.  I have seen many signs on those types of door situations that stated "Please Open Slowly".  The building owner or tenant lessee will find out soon enough if that door arrangement creates that problem. 

Maybe someone else knows of something in the codes that indicates otherwise?

November 1, 2017
2:12 pm
gsmidt@lemarsiowa.com
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Local downtown business, population 10,000, had a recessed entrance/exit door on his store front.  The door and some windows had to be removed for him to get some equipment inside the building, no big deal.  When he went to replace the door, had the contractor bring the recessed area out to match or be flush with the front of the building.  Now, his door swings open on to the public walkway.  It is a 6 foot sidewalk, so plenty of walking room.  Poor kid that is walking next to the building when the door opens.  I was thinking there was a code either in IBC or IEBC that prohibits doorways swinging into a public walkway.  If there is, I can't find it.  Using the 2015 I-codes.  We do not have a local ordinance on this.  Any help would be good.