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passive solar pole/rammed earth house
December 21, 2018
10:04 am
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ioangarbuz@gmail.com
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December 21, 2018
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Rammed earth is simple to manufacture, non-combustible, thermally massive, strong, and durable. However, structures such as walls can be laborious to construct of rammed earth without machinery, e. g., powered tampers, and they are susceptible to water damage if inadequately protected or maintained.

January 24, 2014
4:11 am
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george craciun
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January 22, 2014
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well California has always been a littile funny, I almoast considered moving there years back, not sure what was going through my head at the timeLaughing.

 

To answear your question, not sure if this is Michigan speciffic, but here we still have some of those basic freedoms, like pursuit of happiness for example, and if building your own house from an Idea makes a man happy there are ways of doing it, that is if you know what you are doing, we still have to live by the same rules and be code compliant, I read this on the goverment site for residential under 3500 sqft drawings are not even required if a basic description of the project is provided, well if I were trying to build a plain 20x40 standard log cabin that might work, this is a bit more involved, if I were building in the city they may be giving me a hard time, but still can do it.

 like I mentioned in my first tread I am no architect, not a wallmart greater either Laughing, besides I needed a way to put my thoughts on paper, when you know what you want and you want it done right, you know what they say .... DiY. but again it still has to be right, code compliant or it wont pass review. I am no stranger to construction, building maintenance, I hold several licences ( well used to got out of that field 5 years ago ).The building inspector actually pointed me to this site to learn more about code compliance.

so anyway where I last got stuck was the floor details, what I am trying to acomplish here is a Hybrid if you will, the roof and the glass wall to the south rests on the pole foundation, in pole construction ( I read the book ) the floor and walls are not load bearing but rather a load themselves, further more the furnishings add even more weight to the floor, so the idea is, provided the proper knee bracing is in place, to remove all that weight off the pole foundation an to do more a slab and masonary type instead, which it'self is load bearing, doesnt have to be considered as such but it will reinforce the building, so I have done some more reading about state of the art if you will, basement watterproofing, radiant heat slab insulation, and tweeked my drawing some.

The idea here is to have the entire south wall all glass, about 12 feet worth shine the massive floor and walls, all the closets are on the north wall no windows there, I am rather impressed about what I read regarding Rammed Earth, and that is what I want my walls to be , I have also incorporated insulation, supposedly Rammed earth is about 0.8R and I have 18 inches worth, and foam insulation 5-6R 6 inches worth, should get about 40 R out of these walls, I drew in some more insulation similar to what they comonly do for basements, supposedly the foal will take some of the frost beating so the building doesnt have to, if I end up doing that roo I am looking at an estimated 70 R, I think I got enough unless I did not understand how to properly calculate it, I am also looking at a 4 ft solid insulated roof, should be good there, as for the south there are supposed to be 2 layers of glass one on the outside perpendiculad to the winter solstice at high noon , one between hte taller poles, creating aproximately a 12 foot buffer zone for the living space air has an R value too, minimal but 12 feet worth adds up.

well that is what I am trying to acomplish, and in all honbesty most architects these days are too caught up photocopying subdivisions and town houses from text books, I honestly don't even have the patience to consider looking one up, and taking them back to school and explaining solar gain and thermal mass, its sad but I have no faith in a suit in a cubical, If there was a Michael Reynolds or a Malcolm Wells in Michigan I would consider letting them have this part of the project but I have yet to hear of one so untill than I'm it.

Granted the pole structure I am still working on to make sure is properly braced but as far as loads it only holds up the roof, and even that will rest some weight on the Rammed earth walls, we could do the math and calculate loads, I'm sure it will do fine. My concern was watterproofing and insulating the floor/walls but I think I got that sorted at least in concept.

I was hoping if anybody wiser and more experienced than I would actually glance at those drawings and make any necessary suggestions, I would still ask the same even if an architect drew it just to make sure, I am somewhat familiar with drafting ( some 15 years ago, thou I have been using my boys school supplies ), if I had my way I would hire the building inspector as a consultant if that did not create a conflict of interest, I honestly trust his experience more than a kid that drank half his tuition money and somehow managed to graduate ( this is potentially my last home, why I feel I need to be involved and see it through ), actually just got an Ideea, I think I am going to go to the next town over and consult theyr inspector.

Either way, any input much apreciated, at the moment I am only working on the structure main priority is that it stands up and stays dry sorry about the pour picture that draft paper is too large to scan I'll see about breaking it down but still working on it

 

January 23, 2014
11:45 am
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kevin ellis
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I don't know in which state or locality you reside. Requirements change based on the adopted codes of your state and municipality.

I'm in California, and at the very least here you would need a licensed architect or engineer to design the electrical, mechanical and structural portions of your project.  

January 22, 2014
2:08 pm
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george craciun
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January 22, 2014
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Hello my name is George, I am looking into building a different house, Earthship inspired, passive sollar, thermal mass principle

Attached is a rough drawing of what I had in mind, had to put my thoughts on paper somehow, I know a few things however I am no architect, so I am looking for a few pointers as far as what I may have left out in order to be code compliant.

The structure is plain old polebarn, less the floor and walls, which in normal pole construction are not load bearing but rather load themselves, so that should in theory lighten thee load on the poles considerably, provided the poles are properly braced, instead I would like to do an earthen floor/rammed earth combination, which is considered to be load bearing for about 600 psi, it doesnt have to be considered as such but it would strenghten the building, all glass wall to the south for solar gain, all the closets on the north east and west for more insulation.

question is, what else should I be concerned as far as tructure goes to be code compliant, I am aware that somehow a vapor barrier needs to be installed, and the lowes point on the floor structure has to be at least 1 foot above the watter table, like I said I know a few but I am not knowleadgeble by any means, since I have the floor level drawn below grade I am looking at a basement simmilar construction.

where can I get some drawings describing how conventional basements are done, I know they are concrete but I asume there is more to it, watterproofing to say the least.

any feedback much apreciated