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Natural Gas Pool Heater in Garage
March 4, 2019
9:32 am
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ded221971@gmail.com
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February 7, 2019
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Pool heaters require careful installation and maintenance!

February 1, 2019
1:00 pm
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fgrable@iccsafe.org
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See IFGC Section 305.4 and 305.5  (2015 edition references) for vehicle impact protection.

January 30, 2019
1:19 pm
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suq30@dayrep.com
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It is really necessary to protect the heater from getting damaged. To protect it from sun and rain we can either put cover on it or we can have a special area for it. This will not only protect it getting damaged but also increase it's performance as well as it's life.

May 1, 2004
8:31 pm
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ggrizzell
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April 28, 2004
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Besides all of this, what about physical protection for the equipment?

April 28, 2004
8:41 pm
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jsmurphy
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UMC 2000 Sec 303.5Indoor locations; "Room volume shall be computed using gross floor area and the actual ceiling height up to a maximum 8 feet."
I believe this includes garages, because there is no exceptions listed.
UMC ''97 Sec. 304.2 states the same height maximum.

[This message has been edited by JSMurphy (edited 04-28-2004).]

April 28, 2004
1:29 pm
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snickers
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The burner being 18" off the floor would be okay. Code section says that the source of ignition must be 18" off floor, not the appliance.

Calculations for combustion air as follows:

Section 1702.1
100,000 BTU / 1000 = 100
100 X 50 cubic feet = 5000 cubic feet required for combustion air

Garage 19'' X 19'' X 9'' = 3249 cubic feet available

Appliance not allowed w/o additional combustion air brought in. 1702.2

April 28, 2004
8:29 am
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alan h
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The unti is 100,000 BTU and the garage is 19''X19'' with 9'' ceilings so the air volume is ok.

If the internal burner is 18" off the floor would this count as having the source of ignition the required 18"?

April 28, 2004
7:56 am
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jbh
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Check the installation instructions to see if indoor use is permitted. I have seen several that could work either way. Any source of ignition must be 18" above the floor, so you have a violation with that at the least. The installation instructions will list the BTU rating to calculate the needed combustion air as snickers mentioned. Piping in combustion air from outdoors may be needed.

April 28, 2004
7:26 am
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ba109
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Cannot be installed in a residential garage unless it is listed for that location.

Upon finding a listed unit, install per manufacturers instructions and applicable code.

April 28, 2004
5:45 am
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snickers
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Check the btu input on the appliance. Then calculate out the required space that is needed for the appliance per 2000 IRC 1702.1 and 1702.2. 50 cubic feet per 1000 btu input. If the unit has 150k btu input, it needs 7500 cubic feet in the garage. A 25'' x 25'' garage w/ 8'' ceilings only has 4600 cubic feet of space; 9'' ceilings: 5175; 10'' ceilings: 5750. I have seen some of these pool heaters that have 250k input. That is probably the reason for the rating as an outdoor appliance.

April 28, 2004
5:44 am
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frank castelvecchi
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If it is listed for outdoor application carbon monoxide poisioning is a real possibility even with the forced ventilation vent ducted outside.

Fan forced vents operating under positive pressure can leak and a unit designed for outdoor use may also leak combustion gasses.

If not labled for indoor use send it out.

April 27, 2004
3:39 pm
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eprice
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If the IRC is applicable in your area, and depending upon the height of the flame or other "sources of ignition" within the heater, this may very well be a violation of M1307.3. Other mechanical codes have similar requirements.

Apart from that, if this unit is designed to be installed outdoors and the manufacturer''s instructions state that, I would want to see a letter from the manufacturer stating this installation meets their approval.

April 27, 2004
3:10 pm
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alan h
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No, the unit is sitting on a one inch thick concrete block which is in turn sitting directly on the garage concrete floor.

The heater is designed to be set directly on a concrete pad outdoors so I would image setting in the same manner on a garage floor would be ok.

April 27, 2004
2:38 pm
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jbh
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sp_Print Print Post Post #14

Is the unit 18" above the floor?