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Wall Mounted Space Heater In Garage ?
November 20, 2019
11:37 pm
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brian.moser8@hotmail.com
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Every space heater will make the air move, even radiant floors. The question is, how much. Two things happen when you blow air around a space, as with a forced-air furnace or ceiling fan. First, you increase convection on the outside wall, which adds to heat loss and infiltration. The idea that you can push that hot air down from the ceiling only works efficiently if your ceilings are over 14' or so and you think that a fan blowing on you makes you warmer. (Think summertime fans). You may even the air temperature from floor to ceiling but you will be burning electricity to do it.

http://www.nrel.gov/docs/fy01o...../29513.pdf

Infrared, whether tube or panel pictured will emit heat at the speed of light and warms objects first, which then re-emit heat waves to other objects and all will convect or move warm air, much of which will end up at the highest point of the ceiling.

Infrared tubes will also convect but most of the heat will be in the form of radiation raising the temperature of objects more quickly than forced-air can do. This has to do with 1800°F surface area vs. the 120° air coming from the common ducted register.

So, as stated here, use a two-stage infrared tube with ducted intake air and vent that is properly sized to the load with the second stage available for the quick heat up for the weekend hobby shop. And start it up the night before so it has a chance to make the space warm before you get there.

With this arrangement, ceiling fans are just burning electricity and cooling off your head unless the air at the ceiling is very warm (as is the case with a space overheated by a wood burner for instance.

I am always looking for the most comfort at the lowest operating cost. If it isn't radiant floors, ceilings or walls, it is an infrared tube.

The infrared unit heater pictured is a vent-less heater and will consume oxygen and emit great amounts of water vapor. They are not for the small shop and should only be specified by a trained professional. This is especially true of new, tight construction. Also, you can check the article with reviewed heater units available on the market.

And don't forget those CO/smoke detector people!

I hope it helps!

October 13, 2019
8:23 am
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mwiliams446@gmail.com
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you can use infrared wall mounted infrared space heater in your garage. I am using Dr. Infrared Heater for 3 years. it warms my 900 sq ft garage very quickly. 

 

MODERATOR COMMENT:  This thread was about permanently installed fuel fired space heater mounted on the wall. This post is someone's experience about using a portable electric heater (not a fuel-fired heater). 

November 8, 2018
5:21 am
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lettermanpoul@gmail.com
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I know it's an old thread, but maybe it will be a timely resurrection for someone

November 17, 2006
2:57 pm
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rosso
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Seabee,

2003 IRC;

G2408.1 (305.1) General.
Equipment and appliances shall be installed as required by the terms of their approval, in accordance with the conditions of listing, the manufacturer?s instructions and this code. Manufacturers? installation instructions shall be available on the job site at the time of inspection. Where a code provision is less restrictive than the conditions of the listing of the equipment or appliance or the manufacturer?s installation instructions, the conditions of the listing and the manufacturer?s installation instructions shall apply.

G2408.2 (305.3) Elevation of ignition source.
Equipment and appliances having an ignition source shall be elevated such that the source of ignition is not less than 18 inches (457 mm) above the floor in hazardous locations and private garages. For the purpose of this section, rooms or spaces that are not part of the living space of a dwelling unit and that communicate directly with a private garage through openings shall be considered to be part of the private garage.

Exception: Elevation of the ignition source is not required for appliances that are listed as flammable vapor resistant and for installation without elevation.

G2408.3 (305.5) Private garages.
Appliances located in private garages shall be installed with a minimum clearance of 6 feet (1829 mm) above the floor.

Exception: The requirements of this section shall not apply where the appliances are protected from motor vehicle impact and installed in accordance with Section G2408.2.

"Manufacturer''s installation instructions required and specifically stated for garage installation; and require instructions on site at time of inspection".

Hope this helps.

Uncle Bob

November 20, 2006
6:58 am
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paul curry
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I hate to throw an additional wrench into this thread, but I just read it this morning...

Now that the space is heated (conditioned), in my jurisdiction it would have to pass the IECC building envelope requirements. The garage must be insulated, and I''m curious how the overhead door would meet the fenestration requirements in the IECC for leakage. Guess what... this is now HEATED space as defined in the IECC, not a garage, and consequently must comply.

November 18, 2006
3:42 pm
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feedabee
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Much Thanks "Uncle Bob" and "skdryer" for your input.

I don''t have an answer that will provide heat for the pets and have the space heater in a convenient location. Telling the homeowner that he will have to put the space heater at least 6 ft. up probably won''t cut it. I''m still trying to come up with some type of permanent barrier that the homeowner can install so the vehicles won''t run into it. The space heaters that I have seen ( in the Commercial repair shops ) come to mind.

Anyhoo, thanks for your input. 🙂

I don''t think that I can go having "rats" around as pets, irregardless of how good their social etiquette is. 😀

[b]A Side Story:[/b] Years ago, when I was stationed at Guantanano Bay, Cuba, some people would go down to the base dump and have target practice on the furry critters as something to do.
Boy, ...they sure were bored! Surprised

.

November 18, 2006
7:10 am
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skdryer
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it is allowed to have a furnace, water heater, unit heater,in a garage. not considered hazardous conditions we do it all the time pilot has to be raised 18" above floor this allows for the fumes to linger underneath the unit i would not want to see a ventless heater in a garage but it would be allowed if all requirements r made

November 17, 2006
4:06 pm
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rosso
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Ok,

M1702.1 Required volume. (combustion air)

Where the volume of the space in which fuel-burning appliances are installed is greater than 50 cubic feet per 1,000 Btu/h of aggregate input rating in buildings of ordinary tightness, insofar as infiltration is concered, normal infiltration shall be regarded as adequate to provide combustion air.

You have 28,000 Btu/h? and 3,308 cu. ft..

50 X 28 = 1400 cu. ft.; so you have plenty of combustion air; and with the air from around the garage door you should be good to go for normal infiltration.

The only thing I can think of the prevent the installation is:

M1701.4 Prohibited sources. 2nd sentence;

Combustion air shall not be obtained from an area in which flammable vapors present a hazard.

(Kind of hard to enforce if a gas-fired water heater is already in the garage; or if they are allowed in garages; and they are).

I have tried pleading; and, sometimes it worked. If they are going to leave the cars outside to prevent the poor puppies from being asphixiated from the auto exhaust fumes; they do make a doggy electric heating pad for dog houses. The problem with suggesting something is that should the doggies be electricuted or a short burns down the house; guess who''s it. You might suggest that they go to PetSmart or a similar pet store for advise on what is best for the poor little puppies locked in the mean ole garage. They may have a better solution. I find them very helpful. I have a daughter (at University) who has periodically; stuck me with a hamster; then two rats; and then three Parakeets. By the way; rats really like people and are very affectionate 😀 .

Uncle Bob

November 17, 2006
3:14 pm
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feedabee
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Uncle Bob,

Thanks for the reply! I DID read both of those sections that you listed. I was / am hoping that someone on here will provide some clarity that will allow or dis-allow this particular installation. Such as: [b](1)[/b] The required volume of combustible air in this garage for this size of space heater, or [b](2)[/b] Because of the possible storage of flammable fumes / vapors from vehicles, spills, etc., that this space ( in a private garage ) will be considered a hazardous space, and therefore, NOT allow the installation.

What is the ratio of required combustible air to BTU''s for this appliance ?

Is there anything in the IFC ? or the Life Safety Codes ( although we don''t officially enforce the Life Safety Codes, but occasionally DO reference them ) ?

Still seeking ya''lls "much valued" input. 🙂

Even had the plumber call our department and ask about potentially hazardous installation in this enclosed garage ( it DOES have an openable door on it, otherwise sealed on three sides ).

.

November 17, 2006
2:57 pm
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rosso
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Seabee,

2003 IRC;

G2408.1 (305.1) General.
Equipment and appliances shall be installed as required by the terms of their approval, in accordance with the conditions of listing, the manufacturer?s instructions and this code. Manufacturers? installation instructions shall be available on the job site at the time of inspection. Where a code provision is less restrictive than the conditions of the listing of the equipment or appliance or the manufacturer?s installation instructions, the conditions of the listing and the manufacturer?s installation instructions shall apply.

G2408.2 (305.3) Elevation of ignition source.
Equipment and appliances having an ignition source shall be elevated such that the source of ignition is not less than 18 inches (457 mm) above the floor in hazardous locations and private garages. For the purpose of this section, rooms or spaces that are not part of the living space of a dwelling unit and that communicate directly with a private garage through openings shall be considered to be part of the private garage.

Exception: Elevation of the ignition source is not required for appliances that are listed as flammable vapor resistant and for installation without elevation.

G2408.3 (305.5) Private garages.
Appliances located in private garages shall be installed with a minimum clearance of 6 feet (1829 mm) above the floor.

Exception: The requirements of this section shall not apply where the appliances are protected from motor vehicle impact and installed in accordance with Section G2408.2.

"Manufacturer''s installation instructions required and specifically stated for garage installation; and require instructions on site at time of inspection".

Hope this helps.

Uncle Bob