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spa time and temperature guidelines - where is the research?
February 5, 2014
7:44 pm
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harry forester
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Maybe the Consumer Product Safety Commission can offer some guidance. Also, try calling some portable spa manufacturers and see if you can get someone to talk to you about it.

February 5, 2014
12:29 pm
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jose helu
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No, I'm not the laywer you spoke with, nor am I a lawyer at all.  I am just a lowly consumer who is baffled that requirements are printed on tags and insisted upon by contractors, but nobody (and I've been looking for over ten years) knows why these requirements exist, or even if they are backed by any actual research other than somebody's guesswork after a few beers.

In this case, my spa indicates that one should limit exposure to 104 degrees for 15 minutes, and that one can stay in "longer" if the temperature is "lower".  (It says this in several places in different ways).  However, there's no way to guesstimate how much longer when it's how much lower.

Now, as these warnings are probably required by law (which refers to a code, which refers to a standard, which refers.... to either research or a few drinking buddies throwing darts), it should be possible to, without much effort, track this down.

However, it seems to be beyond the realm of normal human capability.  So, I question whether there is any research behind this whatsoever.

Jose

 

February 5, 2014
1:43 am
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nicholas sasso
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Part of me wonders if you are the lawyer that called me last week.  Anyway, it isn't always as simple as finding "a code."  There are codes, there are standards, there are listings, there are manufacturer's recommendations, etc.  Everything has to be used properly and in the fashion it was designed for.  Standards are a completely different animal than codes.  They usually will not "stand" on their own (no pun intended) although I have seen experts try to do that.  Codes will reference standards.  Your question involves someone digging.......deep.  Probably we can't answer it on a message board.  Yes, if I was hired to research that question, I would charge $$$$.$$.  But maybe you will get lucky and someone can post here.

February 2, 2014
5:12 pm
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jose helu
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[Image Can Not Be Found] Posted by Nick Sasso

You need a building code expert.

How do I get one to talk to me?  Nobody will answer my question unless I join their organization and buy the book of codes; this is hundreds of dollars in some cases, and sometimes thousands.

January 29, 2014
10:35 pm
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nicholas sasso
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You need a building code expert.

July 2, 2012
10:32 am
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jose helu
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Thanks for getting back to me.  I figured the danger had to do with induced fever, but was unable to locate the actual research that led to the specific times and temperatures.  I look forward to what you can dig up.

Jose

 

July 2, 2012
10:20 am
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shawn martin
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I've spoken to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention about your question, and they've been digging into it.  So far they haven't nailed it down, but they indicated that they think it is related to something called "induced fever" where the body temperature is raised in the same way it would be if you had a serious fever.  This can be dangerous for certain populations like pregnant women and those with weak or diseased cardiovascular systems.  BUT, that's not their final word on it, so hang tight while they dig further.

Just wanted you to know that someone is working on it!

March 31, 2012
3:37 pm
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jose helu
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Where can I find the original research that led to the caution on spas that says something like "Do not soak for more than 15 minutes at 104 degrees.  You can soak longer if the temperature is lower", and why is there no guidance on how much longer for how much lower?

Jose