Forum ProfileBack
Advanced

— Forum Scope —




— Match —





— Forum Options —





Minimum search word length is 3 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters

Lost password?
sp_TopicIcon
garage
March 31, 2018
5:38 pm
Avatar
Gordonmjulian@gmail.com
New Member
Members
Forum Posts: 1
Member Since:
March 31, 2018
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

We need a fire exit out the back and need to add one. Can we leave the 6" stem wall and have a step up and out the door or do we need to cut out the stem wall so the threshold is flush. Could we use a ramp? Instead of cutting?

October 19, 2000
7:52 pm
Avatar
mwconst
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 20
Member Since:
September 1, 2000
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I know of nothing in the building code that would require a drop in elevation between the garage and house or that the garage slab should slope to the door. Our company makes the garage and house floor the same elevation in all cases and we do not slope to the doorway. This makes access from garagae to house much easier. Sloping the floor only makes it harder to install work benches and shop equipment. This also eliminates the problem of a curb on the inside of the garage which is unsightly and inconvenient for cabinets and equipment. Who washes out their garage and if it floods to the elevation of the garage floor it will also flood the house floor.

October 19, 2000
7:28 pm
Avatar
skip
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 263
Member Since:
October 19, 2000
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

CABO does require sloping but does not set amount. A step is not require. The rule regarding a step can be found in BOCA R-2 use group (multi-family structures)The reason for the step is to prevent heavy gases from entering the residence.There is a different liability and sense of responsibility in multi-family units verses the single family home.

October 17, 2000
5:23 am
Avatar
hamiltonjerry
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 7
Member Since:
October 17, 2000
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

The CABO building code requires that garage floors be not less than 4" below adjacent dwelling floors and be sloped toward the main vehicle entrance door (Section R-209-3)

October 13, 2000
7:22 pm
Avatar
mark mccay-moran
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 4
Member Since:
September 12, 2000
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Strictly as a code requirement: can anybody quote the UBC or Fire Code sections that dictate slope and level change requirements?

The only practical reason for the level change that I can see (other than spill/flood containment) would be leakage safety in the presence of gas-fired equipment.

In hillside construction there are plenty of examples garages many feet above adjacent residences. As far as slope goes: although not common, there are builders who prefer to simplify a monolithic pour by eliminating the stem wall and slope. Usually the front edge of the slab is depressed and slopes to just behind the door to exit any driven rain.

October 10, 2000
2:19 pm
Avatar
duty calls
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 32
Member Since:
October 10, 2000
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

There has been quite a few homes in our city that have the garage at the level as the dwelling.
Two different types mainly. One type is duplexes and the other is single family. Both are slab houses and are popular with older residents that do not want to scale any steps.

The garages have floor drains in them that would catch any water that might come back into the house from flooding.

These are the exceptions because most of the garages are lower than the main floor... but not always.

Duty Calls

October 10, 2000
1:15 pm
Avatar
curtis
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 47
Member Since:
June 19, 2000
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

The code requires that there be a 6" from the grade to the mud sill. There is also a requirement of a 2% slope of the Garage. To have the garage slab and the grade match, it means a 4" step from the house to the garage for a normal 20 ft deep garage. I don''t know the exact code sections, but this is pretty standard for the industry.

October 10, 2000
1:10 pm
Avatar
estwing1
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 6
Member Since:
March 30, 2000
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

The question is, are you concerned with "common sense" or code requirements?

As most of us know, the two are rarely the same.

October 10, 2000
11:37 am
Avatar
danr
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 208
Member Since:
February 14, 2000
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

There is "common sense" to having the house interior finished floor elevation higher than the garage and surrounding grade. It is NOT for spill containment, but it''s to prevent flooding from stormwater during a rainstorm event. If storm water enters the garage, the slope of the garage should be such that it flows back out of the garage and away from the house.

There is a code requirement for sloping the grade next to a house with a 6" drop over 10 feet. That req''t can be found in the CABO code for residential construction. The purpose of this requirement is to prevent the foundation from eroding due to repeated storm water infiltration.

October 10, 2000
7:56 am
Avatar
carl
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 358
Member Since:
March 6, 2000
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
sp_Print Print Post Post #10

I know of no code section that requires a drop in floor level at the garage or a sloping floor.
Nor do I see any "common sense" that says so. Most folks driveways slope to the street, does "common sense" tell us to have anything spilled in the garage drained into the street?
A squegee(how do ya spell that?) directs spilled liquids quite well. (assuming a skilled operator)
If there is not an elevation change to the house, spills could go that direction. maybe that should be the code requirement, spill containment!!

October 9, 2000
7:51 pm
Avatar
dubhri
New Member
Members
Forum Posts: 2
Member Since:
October 9, 2000
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
sp_Print Print Post Post #11

Dan R is correct, the garage floor should be 6" below ffl. try the fire regs. also the party wall between garage & house has to be firewall for compatrmentation.

October 9, 2000
6:16 pm
Avatar
garage
New Member
Members
Forum Posts: 2
Member Since:
October 8, 2000
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
sp_Print Print Post Post #12

DanR do you have a section out of the UBC that requires this????

October 9, 2000
3:54 pm
Avatar
ron nybo
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 31
Member Since:
September 9, 2000
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
sp_Print Print Post Post #13

The ''97 UBC does not address elevation differences between R-3 and U-1 occupancies nor does it require any degree of slope for the floor.

It does indicate that garage floor surfaces shall be of noncombustible or asphaltic paving materials (312.5).

Good construction standards and common sense tell us that the garage floor should be sloped away from the house floor.

October 9, 2000
9:28 am
Avatar
danr
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 208
Member Since:
February 14, 2000
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
sp_Print Print Post Post #14

If you asking about the garage floor relative to the inside of the house, the answer is yes. The garage floor should be lower than the inside of the home.

Typically, I set the finished floor at least 6 inches higher than the highest point of the surrounding grade. Also, the garage floor should slope away from the house towards the garage door and exterior grade.

October 8, 2000
8:09 pm
Avatar
garage
New Member
Members
Forum Posts: 2
Member Since:
October 8, 2000
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
sp_Print Print Post Post #15

Sorry i meant lower than the rest of the house. what section says it has to slope?

October 6, 2000
5:13 pm
Avatar
jerry mccarthy
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 73
Member Since:
February 15, 2000
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
sp_Print Print Post Post #16

Do you mean lower than the garage floor or the garage floor lower than the kitchen floor?
One thing you can bank on is the code requires the garage floor to slope towards the vehicle door.

October 6, 2000
5:10 pm
Avatar
jerry mccarthy
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 73
Member Since:
February 15, 2000
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
sp_Print Print Post Post #17

Lower than what? [IMG]http://www.icbo.org/ubb/confused.gif[/IMG]