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Restaurant vs Bar Occupant Load Calculation
May 13, 2019
10:45 am
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farside_11@hotmail.com
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June 3, 2016
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I understand that there is a difference between bar and restaurant occupant loading. My question is, does the code define "bar" and "restaurant". The plans examiner is defining this space as a bar because it is named Doomsday Brewery. To classify a space by the name is pretty arbitrary. If they changed their name to Doomsday Restaurant it now is a restaurant? That doesn't make sense. 

Since they don't serve hard liquor and a minor can sit anywhere in the space including the bar/counter it would seem a restaurant is a more appropriate classification. Thoughts?

 

Thanks for  your response.

 

Kevin

Kevin Kincaid

May 11, 2019
7:40 pm
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joesupulski@gmail.com
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The difference between a 'Bar' and a 'Restaurant' in the Code is differentiated by the Occupant Load calculations.

Assembly Occupancy (A-2) Occupant Load calculations from IBC section 1004 differ based on how the A-2 space is used.

A 'Restaurant' Occupant Load is normally calculated based on 'un-concentrated tables and chairs' and calculated at 15 square feet per person.

A "Bar' Occupant Load is normally calculated based on a 'Standing Space' and calculated on 5 square feet per person.

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A 1000 square foot 'restaurant' space would have a calculated occupant load of 67 based on IBC 1004.

A 1000 square foot 'bar' space would have a calculated occupant load of 200 based on IBC 1004....and would require the building to have an automatic fire sprinkler system to comply with IBC 903.

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The plans examiner is probably correct in his review, and that your occupant load is actually greater than you propose.