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Hurricane Harvey Projected to Hit the Texas Coast Soon

Hurricane Harvey Projected to Hit the Texas Coast Soon

Current indications point to a strong, potentially devastating, hurricane reaching Texas by this afternoon. According to the National Hurricane Center, Hurricane Harvey is quickly gaining strength and is forecast to become a Category 3 hurricane with winds of at least 111 mph by the time it hits the Texas coast later today or early tomorrow.

The International Code Council (ICC) is paying close attention to this hurricane as it develops. As a building safety professional, you are well aware of the importance of building safety, especially in the face of destructive storms. Our members play an integral role in preparing communities for natural disasters such as this by ensuring that buildings are up-to-date and follow the code requirements. Unfortunately, even when the emergency preparedness plan is in place and the building safety codes are strong, major storms can still leave behind devastation in their wake.

The Code Council promotes safe buildings and resilient communities in quiet periods and in times of greatest need, and we stand ready to help. ICC staff have a long history of working with the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s (FEMA’s) Mitigation Assessment Team (MAT) Program after disasters such as Hurricane Isaac in 2012 and Hurricane Rita in 2005. Through the MAT Program, FEMA can quickly assemble and deploy teams of investigators to evaluate the performance of buildings and related infrastructure in response to the effects of natural and man-made hazards.

In addition, ICC’s Disaster Response Network (DRN) is available to help jurisdictions after a natural disaster. DRN gives member building safety professionals the opportunity to volunteer to help jurisdictions who request aid with building damage assessment, building inspections and other code-related functions in disaster areas. If you would like to add your name to the list, please click here to register.

If you are a code official in an affected jurisdiction and your community is in need of help, you can contact Karla Higgs, ICC Vice President of Member Services, at 888-422-7233, ext. 5268, or khiggs@iccsafe.org.

Join us at the Government Relations Forum

The ICC Government Relations Department is bringing a prestigious group of speakers to our annual conference in Columbus to discuss several current topics and emerging trends across the country. The presentation topics include a discussion on residential energy efficiency and home energy ratings, how building and energy codes affect realtors and their clients, and the latest on developing science-based tools to measure resilience in our communities. Read more.

Hurricane season forecast increased

The Atlantic hurricane season officially began June 1 and runs through Nov. 30, but the increasing strength of Tropical Storm Harvey is a reminder that the most notorious Atlantic hurricanes typically occur during the season’s peak from August through October. Read more

We’ve changed the way you’ll experience Annual Conference

This year’s ICC Annual Conference and Building Safety & Design Expo in Columbus, Ohio, will bring together building safety professionals from across the spectrum with plenty of opportunities to advance your career and network with peers in a meaningful way. With this year’s schedule packed full of interesting, educational and fun events, ICC added some new features and made changes to the way you’ll experience Annual Conference. Read more.

ICC Site Status Update

We are experiencing unusually heavy traffic on our website that is causing technical difficulties at the moment. Please be patient with us as we work to fix this issue. Thank you.

Code Council launches a new cloud-based testing system for professional certification exams

blankblankICC on YouTube blankTweet This blankSend to Linkedin blankSend to Facebook blankblank blankICC Codes & Standards Discussion Forum
ICC News Release
For Immediate Release
August 21, 2017
www.iccsafe.org
Contact: Whitney Doll
(202) 568-1798
wdoll@iccsafe.org

Code Council launches a new cloud-based testing system for professional certification exams

PRONTO enables candidates to take tests securely any time of day

Washington, D.C. – The International Code Council (ICC) today unveiled a new cloud-based testing system, Proctored Remote Online Testing Option (PRONTO), which enables candidates to take ICC certification exams at their convenience on their home or office computer.

The ICC Assessment Center provides educational and credentialing services supported by the International Codes (I-Codes), a coordinated, comprehensive set of construction, fire and energy codes used in the U.S. and around the globe. In the past, test takers had to travel to approved locations for certification exams. The new cloud-based system allows users to take proctored ICC certification exams on their own computer at home, in an office or at another secure location of their choice. This system will supplement the brick and mortar computer-based exam sites and paper-and-pencil testing that were the only options previously available.

“The Code Council is the first building safety professional credentialing organization to provide this convenient testing option to their candidates,” said ICC Director of the Assessment Center Michelle Porter. “We are always looking for new ways to increase the availability and ease of access to exams for our members and other test takers, and we are excited to be able to offer this innovative service.”

“This new system will help us provide better support to our members and the next generation of code officials,” said ICC Executive Vice President and Director of Business Development Mark Johnson. “Ultimately, by expanding access we hope to increase the number of qualified individuals who are certified for jobs in the building trades that are crucial to our nation’s safety and economic growth.”

PRONTO also allows users to immediately see their exam results. ICC currently has 23 exams available online with plans for additional offerings in the future. Click here to learn more about PRONTO.

About the International Code Council
The International Code Council is a member-focused association. It is dedicated to developing model codes and standards used in the design, build and compliance process to construct safe, sustainable, affordable and resilient structures. Most U.S. communities and many global markets choose the International Codes.

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Understanding Your Score

Scoring for Certification Exams

Understanding Your Score

How is my exam scored?

What is a passing score?  A passing score is the score set by the ICC and/or/with the Exam Development Committee (EDC) as the minimum score needed to pass the exam. This score is technically called a scale score and is set as 75 for the National Certification exams.

How is a passing score set?  A passing score is set as part of the process at the Exam Development Committee. This part of the process involves setting item-level cut-scores, using the expert judgment of the Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) who are at the EDC. These experts determine what the minimum is that the candidate needs to know in order to obtain the certificate, and a passing score. If you’d like to participate as an SME, visit www.iccsafe.org/certification and click on “Exam Development Committees.”

What is a scale score?  A scaled score transforms a raw test score (the number of test questions answered correctly) into other measurement units, called a scale score. However, please know that a scale score is not the number of questions answered correctly, nor the percentage of questions answered correctly.

Is the current test more or less difficult than prior tests, or future tests? There are multiple forms of the ICC examinations. While these forms were developed from the same set of content specifications, the levels of difficulty of the forms will vary because different exam questions appear on different forms. Some of these questions by their nature (and designated in the cut-score) are more difficult than others, even though they pertain to the same section of the exam. It would be unfair to require a candidate taking a collection (form) of somewhat more difficult questions to answer as many questions correctly as a candidate who took an easier form. So, we use a statistical procedure known as scaling to correct for differences in test form difficulty.

Think of it this way. Let’s say an elementary school hired the ICC to create an exam to test for knowledge of aspects of mathematics. Further, let’s say the exam was called “Addition and Subtraction,” and the Exam Information Bulletin states it is a 100-item exam.

Look at the first ten questions of two different exam forms, both of which measure the concept of ”Addition and Subtraction”:

 

Exam Form Scoring Example

As you can see, the questions on Form 2 are a bit harder than the questions on Form 1. If these were both 100-item exam forms with such a continuing mix of items, it would be unfair to require the students who were administered Exam Form 2 to answer the same number of questions correctly in order to pass.

Why scale the scores?  If we simply reported the total number of questions answered correctly (the raw score), there would be a different passing score for each form of the test (because of those differences in difficulty). This would be confusing to candidates. So, we convert these raw scores to a constant scale such that, say, the designated 75 continues as the minimum score required to pass regardless of the form administered, knowing the number of correct answers needed to pass varies from form to form and from year to year.

What is reported?  Scaled scores of  75 or above are reported as PASS. The ICC does not report the numeric score; the score report simply indicates a passing score by saying PASS. Those who fail the exam are provided the numeric scaled score, along with diagnostic information of their performance on major content areas. This information is for self-evaluation only.

Can my exam score be cancelled?

The Code Council reserves the right to revoke or withhold any examination scores if, in its sole opinion, there is adequate reason to question their validity. Reasons are:

  • Giving or receiving assistance with answers during testing
  • Using unauthorized materials during testing
  • Failing to abide by the rules presented or directions from the proctor(s)
  • Attempting to, or removing examination materials or questions from the testing center.

In cases of examination irregularities which are suspected at testing centers, the scores of the individual(s) involved will not be released unless approved by the Code Council. Additional sanctions may be authorized by the Board, which may include restrictions on retesting for up to three (3) years.

Some scores may be rendered invalid because of circumstances beyond the examinee’s control, such as faulty examination materials or mistiming. These situations will be investigated; when such occurrences result in cancellation of an examinee’s scores, the Code Council will arrange for a makeup examination for the examinees concerned.

Scoring for Contractor/Trades Exams

Most Contractor/Trades examinations require a candidate to answer at least 70 percent of their ques-tions correctly in order to pass the exam. The Master Electrician examination requires 75 percent of the questions to be answered correctly to pass. Particular licensing agencies may require a passing score of higher than 70. It is important that you carefully read the relevant bulletin or contact the licensing agency for information regarding their minimum passing requirement.

Can my exam score be cancelled?

The Code Council reserves the right to revoke or withhold any examination scores if, in its sole opinion, there is adequate reason to question their validity. Reasons are:

  • Giving or receiving assistance with answers during testing
  • Using unauthorized materials during testing
  • Failing to abide by the rules presented or directions from the proctor(s)
  • Attempting to, or removing examination materials or questions from the testing center.

In cases of examination irregularities which are suspected at testing centers, the scores of the individ-ual(s) involved will not be released unless approved by the Code Council. Additional sanctions may be authorized by the Board, which may include restrictions on retesting for up to three (3) years.

Some scores may be rendered invalid because of circumstances beyond the examinee’s control, such as faulty examination materials or mistiming. These situations will be investigated; when such occur-rences result in cancellation of an examinee’s scores, the Code Council will arrange for a makeup ex-amination for the examinees concerned.

ICC Exam Administrative Rules and Procedures